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Friday, November 8, 2019

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North Korea massacre: Fishermen kill 16 crewmates before fleeing Kim’s hermit kingdom

Posted: 08 Nov 2019 01:00 AM PST



SOUTH KOREA has deported two North Korean fishermen suspected of killing 16 fellow crew members on their boat before fleeing to South Korean waters.

Michelle Obama heartbreak: Ex-FLOTUS reveals how she deals with ‘meltdowns’

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 07:25 PM PST



MICHELLE OBAMA spent eight years in the White House alongside her husband Barack Obama, so it is no surprise the ex-First Lady felt stressed from time to time.

Ancient Egypt discovery: Major find as experts close in on Tutankhamun’s step-mum's tomb

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 07:17 PM PST



SCIENTISTS say they are on the brink of uncovering the mysterious tomb of Tutankhamun's step-mum in a never before attempted excavation.

Melania Trump humiliation: How FLOTUS snubbed kiss with Michael Jackson in shock meeting

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 05:34 PM PST



MELANIA TRUMP revealed how she was once asked to kiss Michael Jackson during a surprise meeting.

Melania Trump faces outrage: FLOTUS attacked by protestors as she cuddles baby addicts

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 11:32 PM PST



MELANIA TRUMP was attacked by protestors during her visit to Boston Medical Center as she cuddled babies born addicted to opiates as mothers used drugs while pregnant.

Killer shark warning: How British victim would be twelfth attack of island's bloody decade

Posted: 08 Nov 2019 02:08 AM PST



SHARK ATTACK horror has been renewed as a British man is believed to have been killed on Reunion Island, near Mauritius, reaffirming the location's reputation as a highly dangerous region where an array of deadly beasts roam.

Rome earthquake: Strong quake rocks Italy - latest updates

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 09:54 AM PST



ROME has been rocked by a mighty 4.4 magnitude earthquake, sparking terror among Italian citizens.

Spain election polls: The FIVE candidates facing off - who will win Spanish election?

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 09:13 AM PST



SPANIARDS will take to the polls and cast their votes on Sunday for the second time since April. Who will win the Spanish election?

World War 2 breakthrough: Legendary ship found after 70-year search for wreckage

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 08:50 AM PST



A WORLD WAR 2 ship wreckage has been discovered after a 70-year search, unveiling a legendary vessel that played a huge role in a crucial battle before sinking in the Philippines Sea.

Falklands at risk as Argentina's President lifts lid on talks with Jeremy Corbyn

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 06:35 AM PST



THE FALKLAND ISLANDS have been thrust into the political limelight once again after Argentine President-elect Alberto Fernandez made a revelation that Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn called him last week as the new leader in Buenos Aires vows to take back the British archipelago.

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World News, World News Updates, World News Headlines, Latest World News, Current Affairs


Hong Kong Student Who Fell From Height During a Protest Dies

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 10:37 PM PST

A Hong Kong university student who fell from height during a protest earlier this week died in the hospital Friday, a tragedy that may inflame further unrest in the city.

The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology undergraduate, Chow Tsz-lok, 22, died around 8 a.m. of cardiac arrest, the Hospital Authority confirmed. Chow had been hospitalized with a severe brain injury since early Monday morning after he fell from a parking garage in the residential Tseung Kwan O neighborhood where police were attempting to disperse protesters.

Police told reporters Tuesday that Chow was found unconscious after falling 13 feet from the third to the second story of the car park early Monday morning between 12:45 and 1 a.m. A police spokesperson confirmed that tear gas had been fired near the car park where protesters and officers clashed. The exact reasons for Chow’s fall, and whether the tear gas played any role, remain unclear, however.

Both protesters and police have been hurt in the unrest that has roiled Hong Kong since June, but Chow is believed to be the first person to die as a result of injuries sustained during the demonstrations. His death is expected to spark fresh protests and escalate public outcry against the police force, which is already accused of using excessive force in its bid to quell the city’s worst political crisis in decades. One of the key protest demands is an independent inquiry into alleged police brutality.

Protesters have claimed that police blocked an ambulance from reaching Chow, and in doing so delayed the emergency medical response. Police have denied interfering.

On Thursday, Chow’s classmates at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), decried the police as they disrupted a graduation ceremony and chanted protest slogans.

A moment of silence for Chow was held during the university’s second day of commencement ceremonies Friday and a flashmob broke out over lunchtime in the city’s center.

The Provisional President of the university’s student union, Lai Wai-chun, said he hopes the school’s authorities can investigate the reasons for Chow’s fall and for the alleged delay in emergency medical personnel reaching him. “I think the whole of Hong Kong is very disappointed in the police, and does not have any expectation towards them,” Lai says.

Lai added that the university would hold a candlelight vigil at 6 p.m., in addition to an evening memorial at the car park where Chow fell.

The Hong Kong government said in a statement it expressed “great sorrow and regret” over the student’s death, and extended sympathies to his family. A “comprehensive investigation to find out what happened is being conducted,” it added.

News of Chow’s death comes as Hong Kong enters its sixth consecutive month of protests, which have increasingly been marked by anger towards police. Last month, two teenage protesters were shot with live rounds by officers. Both survived.

5 Dead After Major Earthquake Strikes Northwestern Iran

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 07:43 PM PST

(TEHRAN, Iran) — A magnitude 5.9 earthquake struck northwestern Iran early Friday, killing at least five people and injuring over 300 others, officials said.

The temblor struck Tark county in Iran’s Eastern Azerbaijan province at 2:17 a.m., Iran’s seismological center said. The area is some 400 kilometers (250 miles) northwest of Iran’s capital, Tehran.

Over 40 aftershocks rattled the rural region nestled in the Alborz Mountains, and residents rushed out of their homes in fear. The quake injured at least 312 people, state television reported, though only 13 needed to be hospitalized. It described many of the injuries happening when people fled in panic.

The head of Iran’s emergency medical services, Pirhossein Koulivand, gave the casualty figures to state television. There were no immediate video or images broadcast from the area.

Rescuers have been dispatched to the region, officials said. State TV reported the earthquake destroyed 30 homes at its epicenter.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake’s epicenter was at a depth of 10 kilometers (6.2 miles). Shallow earthquakes tend to cause more damage.

Iran is on major seismic faults and experiences one earthquake a day on average. In 2003, a magnitude 6.6 earthquake flattened the historic city of Bam, killing 26,000 people.

A magnitude 7 earthquake that struck western Iran in 2017 killed more than 600 people and injured more than 9,000.

I am Indian. Why is the Government Sending Me Into Exile?

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 05:15 PM PST

The letter from the Indian Ministry of Home Affairs arrived in September 2019. My mother sent me a WhatsApp message of the letter, informing me that the Government of India was revoking my Overseas Citizenship of India (OCI). India doesn’t recognize dual nationality and the OCI – a permanent visa for persons of Indian origin – is the nearest equivalent to dual citizenship and provided to millions of Indians around the world. I had 21 days to respond and to contest their claims; it was day 20 when I had received the letter. If I didn’t respond it would be presumed I had nothing to say in the matter and my OCI would be cancelled. I responded by email immediately to contest their claims, with the Indian Consul General of New York acknowledging receipt, and a hard copy of which was delivered to the Home Ministry. Then, on November 7, after The Print reported that my status was under review, the government announced via Twitter that my OCI status had been withdrawn. This was the first I heard of it.

In May 2019, at the height of India’s general election, I had written an article for TIME that was critical of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. The piece, one of two on the cover of TIME’s International Edition, examined his record in India and the atmosphere of Hindu nationalism. Something about the timing, the headline (“India’s Divider in Chief”) and the image of Modi sent his supporters into a fury. In the days and weeks that followed, people put false content on my Wikipedia page, accusing me of working as a “PR Manager” for the opposition Congress Party; they began on-line petitions denouncing me; they ran amok on social media, making multiple death threats and circulating multiple memes of me with a Pakistani eyepatch. Suddenly, I was portrayed as an agent of shadowy Western interests determined to exert undue influence over the Indian election.

I am Westernized; I am English-speaking; I am part of the despised elite whose entrenched power had helped fuel the rise of Modi. But there was another aspect of my identity that made me especially vulnerable to attack: my father was born in British India to a British mother and a father who became Pakistani when that country was created. And, within twenty-four hours of my piece being published, the BJP spokesman, Sambit Patra, seized on it to delegitimize me. Addressing a press conference, Patra said that the TIME story had been written by a Pakistani and “that nothing better could be expected from Pakistan.” It was a calculated and dangerous misrepresentation, which Prime Minister Modi himself soon seized on. “Time Magazine is foreign,” he said, “the writer has also said he comes from a Pakistani political family. That is enough for his credibility.” Not only was I not a Pakistani, but my relationship with my father – who was Governor of Punjab in Pakistan when he was assassinated in 2011 – had been complicated. Born out of wedlock, I was not in contact with my father until I was twenty-one. I was born in Britain and have British citizenship, but since the age of two I had lived and grown up in India, with my Indian mother, who is a well-known journalist. She had raised me on her own in Delhi and was always my sole legal guardian, and the only parent I knew for most of my life. It was why I had always been viewed as Indian in India and why I had been granted an OCI. The story of my parents’ brief, passionate relationship had in part been the subject of my first book, Stranger to History, which was published in 2009 and widely reviewed in India. I was living in India at the time, and at no time was my legal status ever questioned or challenged by the government until this September.

I had expected a reprisal, but not a severing. While the government did not initially reveal their motivations behind this action, they have now stated their reasons for removing my OCI: “concealed the fact that his late father was of Pakistani origin.” But it is hard not to feel, given the timing, that I was being punished for what I had written.

I read the letter, which in bland bureaucratic language informed me that the country I was raised in and lived in for most of my adult life was no longer mine: “after consideration of facts and circumstances in the matter, “ it read, “the Central government is of the provisional opinion that the registration as an OCI cardholder granted to Aatish Ali Taseer, may be cancelled under Section 7D(a) of the Citizenship Act, 1955, for obtaining OCI card by means of false representation and the concealment of material facts.”

The government had limited means by which they could legally take away my overseas citizenship. Yet they have now acted on those means. For 39 years, I had not so much as needed a visa for India and now the government was accusing me of misrepresenting myself, accusing me of defrauding them. Now, I may not even be able to obtain a standard tourist visa for India, the Consul General in New York informed me by telephone in September, as I have been accused of defrauding the government. “…[T]he registration of such a person,” reads the Home Ministry’s website, “will not only be cancelled forthwith but he/she will also be blacklisted preventing his/her future entry into India.” With my grandmother turning ninety next year – and my mother seventy — the government has cut me off from my country and family.

India is my country. The relationship is so instinctive that, like an unwritten constitution, I had never before felt it necessary to articulate it. I could say I was Indian because I had grown up there, because I knew its festivals and languages, and because all five of my books were steeped in its concerns and anxieties. Though I am a British citizen by birth, the OCI, as a substitute for dual citizenship, had made this bond even more real, as it had for so many people of Indian origin worldwide. Even though marriage had taken me to the US, I have returned to India frequently to write about it and to visit with the only family I have ever known. But to say as much was already to express a degree of removal that felt false. It was like making a case for why one’s name was one’s name. I was Indian because I just was. It was fundamental and a priori. It came before one’s reasons for why it was so. Now that it has been questioned in this letter from the Home Ministry, I felt an odd sense of pity—not for myself, but for my family in India. I thought of my grandmother who had raised me. I thought of how she had met the unconventionality of my mother’s situation—an unmarried woman with a love child—with unquestioned love. That love had given me my sense of belonging. I thought of how outraged she would be to learn that those bonds of affection by which she had bound me to my place were being questioned.

I was due to fly to India from Greece a few days later to finish filming a documentary, but a lawyer advised me that I could be exposing myself to detention if I were to do so. As a journalist I have been in many fearful places in my life – from interrogations in Iran to questioning by the mukhabarat in Assad’s Syria – but this was the first time I had thought of India in that way. Instead, I left Greece and headed back to the U.S.

It is easy to see my situation as individual or unique. But it is symptomatic of a much larger movement. The government that stripped me of my overseas citizenship had just stripped the state of Jammu and Kashmir of statehood, autonomy and basic human freedoms. In the northeastern state of Assam, it was acting to strip 1.9 million people – the great majority Muslim, – of citizenship, rendering them stateless. Earlier this month, some of the country’s most esteemed intellectuals—such as the historian Ram Guha and filmmakers Adoor Gopalkrishnan and Mani Ratnam—were charged with sedition for writing an open letter to Modi imploring him to do more to combat the public spectacle of mob lynchings that have become a frequent occurrence under his premiership (the charges were subsequently dropped).

Out of a habit of mind, I clung to the idea of India as a liberal democracy, the world’s largest. But entering the United States in September, I was aware for the first time that I was no longer merely an immigrant, no longer someone moving between his home country and an adoptive one. I was an exile.

South Korea Deports North Korean Fishermen Who Attempted to Defect After Killing Their Fellow Crew Members

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 04:35 PM PST

(SEOUL, South Korea) — In an extremely unusual case, South Korea deported two North Korean fishermen on Thursday after finding they had killed 16 other crew members on their boat and then fled to South Korean waters, Seoul officials said.

The two North Koreans, both men in their 20s, were captured in their boat south of the countries’ eastern sea border last Saturday, according to Seoul’s Unification Ministry. It said a South Korean investigation later found the two had killed 16 colleagues, including the captain.

South Korea has a policy of accepting North Koreans who want to resettle in the South to avoid political oppressions and economic poverty at home. It is the first time that South Korea has deported any North Korean national who has come to South Korea since the end of the 1950-53 Korean War, according to the Unification Ministry, which deals with North Korean affairs.

Ministry spokesman Lee Sang-min said South Korea decided to expel the two fishermen to North Korea because they were “heinous criminals” who could not be recognized as refugees under international laws. Lee said the two were sent back through the Koreas’ land border.

According to the South Korean investigation, 19 people were aboard the squid fishing boat when it left the North’s Kimchaek port on its east coast in August. While fishing in waters near Russia and elsewhere, the two men collaborated with another crew member and killed the captain, who they said had abused them. The trio later killed 15 other fishermen on the boat to cover up their action.

Kim Ju-hyung—APSouth Korean Defense Minister Jeong Kyeong-doo answers a lawmaker’s question about two North Koreans’ deportation during a defense committee meeting at the National Assembly in Seoul, South Korea, on Nov. 7, 2019.

The three went back to Kimchaek port with the intention of moving to another region of North Korea. But the third fisherman was arrested near the port, and the two fled North Korea using the same boat, the Unification Ministry said, citing the government investigation.

When their boat sailed across the sea border last week, they were chased by a South Korean navy ship which fired warning shots at them. After two days, the two were captured by the South Korean navy on Saturday. They later told investigators they wanted to resettle in South Korea, but South Korean authorities determined they only wanted to avoid North Korean arrest and on Tuesday informed North Korea of their planned deportation, the ministry said.

Observers say the men are likely to receive heavy punishment in North Korea, including possible execution. Some South Korean media questioned why the South Korean government made the deportation decision so early and whether it should have allowed the North Koreans to go through a South Korean judicial process first.

Read more: What It’s Like to Escape From North Korea

North Korean fishing boats have occasionally drifted into South Korean waters, and South Korea has usually accepted those who chose to resettle and repatriated others who wished to return home.

About 32,000 North Koreans have fled to the South since the end of the Korean War, most of them via China and in the past two decades. North Korean defectors are a sore point in relations between the two Koreas, with the North often claiming its citizens are held against their will in the South.

Ties have been strained between the two Koreas as the North ramps up pressure on the United States to make concessions in deadlocked nuclear diplomacy.

The Long History of Mormons in Mexico Began More Than a Century Before the Killing of 9 U.S. Citizens There

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 02:51 PM PST

Nine members of a prominent Mormon family in northern Mexico, all women and children, were gunned down on Nov. 4 in territory whose control is disputed by the Sinaloa Cartel and the La Linea militia.

Mexico, which has experienced high crime for over a decade, has seen violence surge in recent weeks. On Oct. 17, a shootout in the city of Culiacan involving the Sinaloa Cartel led officials to release from custody Ovidio Guzman, the son of jailed drug kingpin Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

In the context of so much bloodshed, the LeBaron killings are both highly unusual and tragically quotidian.

Unlike most murder victims in Mexico, the LeBarons are U.S. citizens and Mormons — part of a religious community that broke away from Utah’s Church of Latter-Day Saints years ago. But, as many Mexican journalists have written, the peace activism of family member Julián LeBaron could also have made his community a target. And the LeBarons have a history of violent encounters with organized crime.

Mormons in Mexican history

In my 2018 book on American and Canadian-based religious enclaves in Mexico, I researched the Latter-Day Saints community and the LeBaron Mormons of Chihuahua state, near the U.S. border. Typically, these communities’ members are somewhat reluctant to talk to outsiders, beyond proselytizing.

But as a person of Mennonite background with relatives in Mennonite colonies in Mexico, I was able to interview members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints — the official name of the mainstream Mormon church — in northern Mexico.

Along with the Romneys — relatives of Sen. Mitt Romney, whose father was born in Mexico — the LeBarons are among the most storied families in Mormon history.

Members of Utah’s Latter-Day Saints community emigrated to Mexico in the 1880s to follow their religious beliefs by living in polygamous families, which was illegal in the United States. Polygamy was illegal in Mexico, too, but the government there offered a flexible definition of family and did not enforce its anti-polygamy laws.

Alma “Dayer” LeBaron, the patriarch, was born in 1886 and grew up as a Latter-Day Saint in Colonia Dublán, Chihuahua. In 1904, he married a women from nearby Colonia Juárez. She left him when he sought a polygamous marriage.

LeBaron fled the Mexican Revolution for Utah in 1912, where he married two women — Maude McDonald and Onie Jones — and had what’s been described as “a large family of sons.”

LeBaron and his big family returned to Mexico in 1924 to find that their Latter-Day Saint neighbors did not welcome their polygamy. So LeBaron established his own colony, called LeBaron, in Chihuahua, Mexico. Today it stretches approximately six miles along a municipal highway and is four miles wide, surrounded by fields. LeBaron also began his own Mormon church.

Poverty and conflicts

For 50 years, the LeBarons migrated back and forth across the Mexico-U.S. border, with Alma’s sons serving as missionaries evangelizing on behalf of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

But the community struggled with poverty and, starting in the 1970s, ran into land conflicts with a nearby farming community that had been granted land by the government after the Mexican Revolution.

The LeBaron colony’s land may have been illegally purchased from this neighboring land grant. Area peasants called the LeBarons “American invaders” and destroyed their fences. This allowed cattle into the LeBaron’s fields, damaging their crops.

Judges in Mexico, however, sided with the LeBarons, whom they saw as productive members of the local economy. The land clashes between Mormon and Mexican ranchers have largely dissipated, though a flare-up occurred just last year.

After Alma Dayer LeBaron died in 1951, his sons — Joel, Ross, Ervil and Verlan — disagreed over the future of the church Alma had established, leading to violence within the family and the formation of new fundamentalist groups.

Ervil LeBaron was arrested and convicted for the 1972 murder of his brother Joel. That verdict was later overturned, but in 1981, a Utah court convicted Ervil of a different murder. He died in prison in 1981.

Members of this community report enduring beatings, underage marriage and other abuse, as the escapee Anna LeBaron recounts in her 2017 memoir The Polygamist’s Daughter.

The LeBarons have also been victims of violence. In 2009, 16-year-old Eric LeBaron was kidnapped by drug traffickers. His family successfully lobbied the government for help and secured his release. In retaliation, a cartel killed Eric LeBaron’s brother Benjamín LeBaron and brother-in-law Luis Widmar in 2011.

Frustrated by violence, another brother, Julián LeBaron, that year joined a high-profile peace movement founded by the poet Javier Sicilia.

LeBaron and Sicilia reportedly fell out in 2012. But after the murder of Julián’s cousin and other family members on Nov. 4, Sicilia wrote a condolence letter encouraging Julián to “uncover the barbaric reality.”

Integration in Mexico

As their peace activism shows, the LeBarons are more integrated in Mexican society than other religious minority groups I’ve studied.

The LeBarons have long sought connections with fellow Mexicans to proselytize about their beliefs. And 39-year-old Alex LeBaron, from this community, has worked for the government of Chihuahua. From 2015 to 2018, he was even an elected official. Alex LeBaron also married a Mexican woman, Brenda Ríos, in a Catholic ceremony.

Like other northern Mexicans, the LeBarons are a thoroughly cross-border community. Much of their purchasing power in Mexico comes from remittances sent by male relatives who work in the U.S.

Like their neighbors, too, the LeBarons are vulnerable to the violence that surrounds them. Mexico’s death toll in 2019 is on pace to exceed the 33,341 murders seen in 2018. In spite of a new National Guard established to fight crime, last year was Mexico’s deadliest year since modern record-keeping began.

Violence in Chihuahua state, where homicides had dropped markedly in recent years is rebounding.

So the LeBarons may have an uncommon backstory. But from kidnappings to gruesome murders, they share a familiarity with tragedy that far too many Mexicans know far too well.

Rebecca Janzen, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature, University of South Carolina

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Mexico Prison Raid Leads to Chaos in Border City

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 10:59 AM PST

(MEXICO CITY) — Mexican security forces continue working inside a state prison in an operation that set off a night of chaos in Ciudad Juarez.

State prosecutor Jorge Nava says eight people were murdered in various incidents Tuesday night as some 850 local, state and federal officers raided the prison.

Four arrested suspects told authorities they were paid in methamphetamine to create a distraction. They burned five private vehicles and 10 buses, including one transporting assembly plant workers. Several workers suffered burns.

Nava said Wednesday it was a “Machiavellian plan to be able to get authorities to stop the operation.”

He did not provide details about the murders.

It was reminiscent of Oct. 17 shootouts in Culiacan that resulted in the release of a son of jailed drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman.

U.S. Diplomatic Cables Reveal Divide Over Immigration Policy

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 10:18 AM PST

(MIAMI) — U.S. ambassadors from El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti sent urgent cables to the White House in the early days of the Trump administration, pleading with them to abandon plans to send hundreds of thousands of migrants back to their home countries.

The cables, made public Thursday, expose the divide between career diplomats and a new administration eager to push through major hardline immigration policies even as it apparently weighed possible fallout on the 2020 presidential race.

Facing legal challenges, the Trump administration later backed down from its hardline position and last month it extended protections for at least a year as U.S. courts work through the disputes.

The internal State Department memos are contained in a report by Senate Democrats that sheds light on diplomats’ alarm ahead of the 2017 decision by the Trump administration to end protections for some 400,000 Central Americans and Haitians living legally in the U.S.

The report suggests that, for the Trump administration, concerns about mass removals of people taking place during the 2020 presidential campaign prevailed over national security warnings from top U.S. diplomats.

The apparent injection of electoral politics in what was supposed to be a policy decision about humanitarian protections for migrants from some of the Western Hemisphere’s poorest and most violent countries came from then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson’s policy planning staff, comprised of political appointees.

It contrasts with the recommendations of U.S. Embassies in the affected countries — El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti — as well as the State Department’s most-senior career diplomat at the time, then-Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs Thomas Shannon. He argued unsuccessfully that taking away so-called temporary protected status, or TPS, for the migrants would destabilize the region and damage the U.S.’ standing in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Nonetheless, the unclassified cables, some of which have surfaced in court battles, provide telling insight on how career officials and political appointees haggled over policy recommendations in the early days of the Trump administration, when the new president’s toughened stance on migration went against, in the case of TPS, decades of bipartisan consensus.

“A sudden termination of TPS for El Salvador would undermine additional cooperation to tackle the root causes of illegal migration and overwhelm the country’s ability to absorb the refugees,” then-U.S. Ambassador Jean Elizabeth Manes wrote in a July 2017 cable to Washington, one of several recommendations received that summer from veteran diplomats who strenuously objected to the decision.

They were backed by Shannon, who was even more unequivocal.

“It is our purpose to provide the best possible foreign policy and diplomatic advice,” Shannon wrote in a private letter to Tillerson, cited in the report by the minority staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. “From my point of view that advice is obvious: extend TPS for the countries indicated.”

The arguments appear to have fallen on deaf ears. In the ensuing weeks, the Trump administration announced it was terminating the program for the three countries, giving migrants, some of whom had lived in the U.S. for two decades, 18 months to leave. The decision threatens to trigger an unprecedented wave of family separations as parents being expelled would be forced to choose between leaving behind their estimated 273,000 American children or exposing them to recruitment by powerful criminal gangs like El Salvador’s MS-13.

“Despite these warnings, the Trump administration recklessly sought to end the TPS designations for El Salvador, Honduras, and Haiti with full knowledge of the inherent dangers of its decisions,” Sen. Bob Menendez, the ranking member of the Foreign Relations Committee, said in an introduction to the report titled “Playing Politics With Humanitarian Protections: How Political Aims Trumped U.S. National Security and the Safety of TPS Recipients.”

The State Department had no immediate comment on the report.

TPS was initially meant to aid people from countries facing wars or natural disasters. Citizens of Honduras were originally granted TPS in 1999 in the wake of overwhelming damage from Hurricane Mitch, while migrants from El Salvador and Haiti gained protection in 2001 and 2010 respectively following devastating earthquakes. Since then, migrants from all three countries have seen those protections extended multiple times as successive U.S. administrations, Republican and Democrat, have acknowledged the difficulty the politically and economically fragile countries would face reabsorbing such a large number of returnees.

Similar arguments are reflected in a lengthy “action memo” with a menu of options sent to Tillerson on Oct. 26, 2017.

In it, Simon Henshaw, then acting head of the State Department’s humanitarian bureau and now ambassador to Guinea, recommends extending TPS for all three countries. But he’s outmaneuvered by Francisco Palmieri, the then top acting diplomat in Latin America, who recommends the programs be terminated over three years.

Tillerson’s staff of political appointees endorses Palmieri’s recommendation but push for termination within two years, pointing out that a 36-month deadline would fall “directly in the middle of the 2020 election cycle.”

No further mention of the election is made, and it’s not clear why exactly Tillerson’s policy staff made mention of the race.

In the end, Tillerson was more eager, and with the stroke of a black pen scribbled “18 months” in three sections of the memo.

Bolivian Mayor Has Hair Forcibly Cut by Masked Protesters as Post-Election Violence Continues

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 10:18 AM PST

The mayor of a city in Bolivia was beaten, dragged through the streets barefoot, covered in red paint and had her hair forcibly cut by a crowd of masked protestors on Wednesday in what appears to be the latest outburst of political violence after a contested election last month.

Patricia Arce, the mayor of Vinto in Bolivia, is a member of President Evo Morales’s Movement to Socialism (MAS) party. The party blamed the attack on opposition protestors, according to local media.

Protesters marched to Vinto city hall in anger following reports of deaths caused when pro-government supporters, who were allegedly sent by the mayor, tried to break up anti-government blockade, local media said.

Arce was forced to walk to a bridge in Vinto, a small town in central Bolivia, by a crowd of masked protesters. There she was forced to kneel down for her hair to be cut and her body sprayed red.

She was then forced to hold a metal pole as she was paraded, barefoot, around the streets with red paint covering her face, hair and clothes.

In a video circulating on social media, Arce, surrounded by masked protestors said: “I’m not afraid to tell my truth. And I’m in a free country. And I’m not going to shut up and if they want to kill me, they kill me. As I’ve said before, for this process of change, I will give my life.”

The protestors, armed with wooden batons and stones, also set fire to the city hall, according to local media reports.

Arce was rescued by Police in Vinto after several hours of being tormented by protesters.

Daniel James—Los Tiempos Bolivia via ReutersPolice rescue Vinto mayor Patricia Arce Guzman on a motorcycle after people threw paint and dirt on her following a fire in Vinto’s Town Hall, in Quillacollo, Bolivia, on Nov. 6, 2019.

At least three people have been killed in the violent clashes between supporters of Morales’s government and opponents in the wake of controversial presidential elections on Oct. 20.

Morales condemned the attack on Arce. In a tweet in Spanish, he said: “All my solidarity with our sister, mayor of Vento, Patricia Arce, who was kidnapped and cruelly harassed for expressing and defending her ideals and the principles of the poorest.

“We condemn the violent actions that cause grief and pain in the Bolivian family,” Morales added.

Morales, Bolivia’s longest ruling leader with 14 years in office, has been accused by his nearest rival for the presidential election, Carlos Mesa, of “a monumental fraud” to get re-elected. The vote is bitterly disputed.

Allegations of fraud emerged on election day after officials abruptly stopped reporting vote results. Morales was beating the eight other candidates at the time of the cutoff, but was also falling short of the percentage needed to avoid a runoff election. A day later, on Oct. 21, the officials released an updated figure showing a sudden surge in Morales’ vote percentage. The figures showed Morales just 0.7% short of the 10-percentage point advantage needed to avoid a runoff.

The European Union and the U.N. expressed concern about the vote, but Morales rejected a request by the Organization of American States for the vote to go to a second round because of the concerns.

On Oct. 24, Morales declared himself the outright winner of the presidential election.

A New Arab Spring Is Unfolding in Iraq and Lebanon. But Things Could Get Bloody If Iran Gets Its Way

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 10:05 AM PST

Since October, protests in Iraq and Lebanon have re-energized the Middle East region as hundreds of thousands of young people descend onto public squares, repeating 2011 Arab Spring slogans that call for regime downfall. But while Iraq and Lebanon could offer great promise if protesters learn from past failures in the region, they could also prove to be bloodier if Iran gets its way.

Middle East protests that have taken hold in the past decade have had their own unique characteristics, but similarities between Iraq and Lebanon are uncanny. Both are highly segmented societies that have undergone painful sectarian civil wars. Both have power-sharing constitutions or political pacts that attempt to keep the peace by dividing spoils of the state, government roles and administrative positions, and parliamentary seats along ethno-sectarian lines. But the more ominous similarity is the well-known interference of Iran into their domestic politics.

Iran’s financial, political and military support for Lebanon’s Hezbollah and for Iraq’s dominant political class in Baghdad from the Dawa party to the Hashd al-Shaabi militant group is clearly menacing. In the early days of Iraq’s protests in October, black clad snipers believed to be Iranian forces took to Baghdad rooftops to take pot shots at protesters using live ammunition; in Lebanon, unknown assailants believed to be with Hezbollah tore down protesters’ tent encampments and physically assaulted protesters in Beirut streets.

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei has already expressed his views on Lebanese and Iraqi protests, a reminder that Iran knows how to deploy armed forces to tamp down protests. The not-so-subtle warning was not just about how Iran cracked down on its own 2017-2018 protests against corruption and economic gloom— arresting almost 7,000 people and reacting to protests with force—but how Iran effectively propped up the Assad regime to annihilate protesters with brutal force.

Protesters have learned from previous Arab Spring masses to use their vast numbers to barricade themselves from security forces and not give up an inch of Baghdad’s Tahrir Square and Beirut’s Martyrs’ Square. They use social media to garner global attention and keep the cameras rolling; and in the case of Iraqis, they find alternate means of getting their messages and videos out to the world when the government shuts down the Internet. Iraqi and Lebanese activists have used non-sectarian and nationalistic messages to counter the existing narratives of political incumbents. In Iraq, hashtags include ‘I want a nation’; in Lebanon ‘all of them, meaning all of them’. They have both held up posters that point to sectarianism as the source of ills in their countries. Increasingly they are also fighting against messaging from the Iranian government and its local media, which says protesters are paid tools of Western intelligence services.

In Lebanon and Iraq, protesters want an overhaul of the entire political structure that uses sectarianism as an excuse for ineptness, depends on cronyism that leads to systemic corruption, and encourages political in-fighting that leads to indecisive policies. Unlike previous Arab Spring movements, they are no longer satisfied with the mere removal of a prime minister here and a president there.

Both countries suffer from enormous dilapidation and underfunding of public infrastructure and services. Young protesters have no memory of foreign invasions and civil wars; they just want a functioning government to deliver consistent electricity, responsibly manage state budgets, and find ways to encourage job growth. Too many Iraqis complain that the security sector is one of the few places to find employment; young Lebanese feel that with 40% youth unemployment they have to leave the country with the vast majority of other Lebanese to find decent work.

Iraq sits on a healthy current account surplus, and earned $65 billion in oil export revenue in 2018 — yetits government cannot seem to provide clean drinking water to the oil-rich region of Basra. The Lebanese parliament had the audacity to ask for a 20 cent tax on citizens’ WhatsApp calls, while its Prime Minister had given $16 million to a South African supermodel for no clear reason.

Like previous Arab Spring protests, Iraqis and Lebanese see corruption as the cause of their countries’ ills. But they have an advantage that neither Egypt, Tunisia, Libya, Bahrain, or Syria had: they are imperfect and nascent democracies. Using the ballot box to usher in competent new leaders is a strategy and avenue for change that other Arab youth did not have.

This is also a challenge as the structure of the democratic process in both Lebanon and Iraq favors sectarian parties over brokerage ones. The incumbent political class will not want to dismantle the inefficient sectarian system that brought them to power. And will Iran crush the protesters before they have a chance to get their technocratic caretaker governments? For now, the at times festive and carnival nature of the Iraqi and Lebanese protests mask nervous fears on the streets that Iran would deploy its local militias to put an end to the protests. That would foreshadow an end to the demonstrations, much like previous Arab Spring protests.

International Criminal Court Sentences Congo Warlord Called ‘The Terminator’ to 30 Years in Prison

Posted: 07 Nov 2019 08:34 AM PST

(THE HAGUE, Netherlands) — The International Criminal Court passed its highest ever sentence Thursday, sending a Congolese warlord known as “The Terminator” to prison for 30 years for crimes including murder, rape and sexual slavery.

Bosco Ntaganda was found guilty in July of 18 counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role as a military commander in atrocities during a bloody ethnic conflict in a mineral-rich region of Congo in 2002-2003.

Ntaganda showed no emotion as Presiding Judge Robert Fremr passed sentences ranging from eight years to 30 years for individual crimes and an overarching sentence of 30 years.

The court’s maximum sentence is 30 years, although judges also have the discretion to impose a life sentence. Lawyers representing victims in the case had called for a life term.

Fremr said despite the gravity of the crimes and Ntaganda’s culpability, his convictions “do not warrant a sentence of life imprisonment.”

Ida Sawyer, deputy director of Human Rights Watch’s Africa division, welcomed the ruling.

“Bosco Ntaganda’s 30-year sentence sends a strong message that even people considered untouchable may one day be held to account,” Sawyer said.

Jolino Makelele, a spokesman for the government in Democratic Republic of Congo, or DRC, said: “We think that justice was done for the victims.”

Ntaganda, who has insisted he is innocent, became a symbol of widespread impunity in Africa in the seven-odd years between first being indicted by the global court and finally turning himself in in 2013 as his powerbase fell apart.

Physicians for Human Rights said the sentencing set an important precedent. But Karen Naimer, who directs the group’s program on sexual violence in conflict zones, added that “international and local prosecution efforts must be dramatically strengthened if we are to curb the rampant impunity for mass atrocities we see in the DRC and elsewhere around the world.”

Judges at Ntaganda’s trial said he was guilty as a direct perpetrator of a murder and as an indirect co-perpetrator of a string of crimes including murders, rapes of men and women, a massacre in a banana field and of enlisting and using child soldiers.

Child soldiers also were raped by Ntaganda’s troops and forced into sexual slavery, leaving them with lasting physical and psychological scars. Ntaganda himself used child soldiers as bodyguards.

“Some individuals who survived or witnessed the murders and attempted murders that Mr. Ntaganda was convicted of still bear permanent scars, both physical and psychological, including long-term memory loss, neurological disturbances and extensive physical scarring,” Fremr said.

Ntaganda testified for weeks in his own defense, saying he wanted to put the record straight about his reputation as a ruthless military leader.

He was the deputy chief of staff and commander of operations for rebel group the Patriotic Forces for the Liberation of Congo. The force’s leader, Thomas Lubanga, was convicted by the ICC in 2012 of using child soldiers. He is serving a 14-year prison sentence.

Ntaganda earned a higher sentence because he was convicted of far more crimes.

He has already launched an appeal against his convictions and has 30 days to appeal against his sentence.

In their unanimous 117-page ruling, the three judges said they could find no mitigating factors that warranted reducing Ntaganda’s sentence.

But they found plenty of aggravating circumstances, identifying in the murder convictions the “particular cruelty” of several crimes, the “defenselessness of some of the victims” and the fact that Ntaganda, as a high-ranking commander, personally murdered a man in front of his subordinates.

Xavier Macky, executive director of the human rights group Justice Plus in Bunia, Congo, said he wants victims to receive compensation.

“This sentence will help heal not only survivors but those who lost their loved ones during the atrocities of Bosco Ntaganda,” Macky said.

Under the court’s rules, victims can apply for reparations. The court said in a statement that “issues related to the procedure for victims’ reparations will be addressed in due course.”

The Hague-based court was set up to prosecute atrocities around the world where national authorities are unable or unwilling to hold trials. It has faced opposition and criticism, most notably from the United States, which is not a member state of the court.

President Donald Trump’s former national security adviser, John Bolton, last year said the U.S. wouldn’t cooperate with the court, adding that “for all intents and purposes, the ICC is already dead to us.”

____

Saleh Mwanamilongo in Kinshasa, Congo, and Al-Hadji Kudra Maliro in Beni, Congo, contributed to this report.

Thursday, November 7, 2019

financial dictionary pdf - financial terminology dictionary - financial dictionary app

financial dictionary pdf - financial terminology dictionary - financial dictionary app


Markets Press Higher as Gold and Bonds Show Correlation

Posted:

While FAANG stocks are showing mixed results for the year, investors are rewarding Google's market position.

SEC Proposes Rules to Restrict Shareholder Proposals

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Th SEC is considering a rule change that would restrict small shareholders ability to challenge corporate governance rules through proxy battles.

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What's New for Online Brokers: Early November 2019 Edition

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Beyond all the price cuts, a few brokers have added new features. We summarize the new offerings at Interactive Brokers, M1 Finance, and Robinhood.

Robo-Advisor vs. Financial Advisor

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The low-cost and technology advantages of robo-advisors can be attractive to younger investors, while a financial advisor will provide more personalized service.

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Impact Investing With a Robo-Advisor

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Socially responsible and ESG investing are gaining traction, especially with younger investors who also may be attracted to the technologically-focused investment platforms that robo-advisors provide.

One Cannabis Company That's Soaring as Pot Stocks Crash

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While cannabis companies struggle to generate capital, one marijuana REIT is making money and paying dividends by leasing out real estate.

How Liquidity Shortage is Fueling Explosive Stock Swings

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Goldman Sachs says falling liquidity has boosted volatility during Q3 earnings season. Stocks with low liquidity move 12% more than normal.

3 Charts That Suggest Financials Are Headed Higher

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Financials have remained relatively unscathed over the past several months. Breakouts now suggest that this group is set to move higher.

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Expedia Stock in Freefall After Weak Quarter

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Travel giant Expedia is trading more than 20% lower in Thursday's session after missing third quarter profit and revenue estimates.

Lights Out: 3 Expensive Utilities Stocks With Chart Tops

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Charts indicate that the utilities sector may be ready for a retracement. Trade these power providers that have formed topping patterns.

Square Stock's Upside Appears Limited After Earnings

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Shares of the payment processor are trading higher after earnings but remain stuck in a range that could persist well into 2020.

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U.S., China Will Cancel Tariffs in Stages: China's Commerce Ministry

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The two countries will rollback additional tariffs in stages as they work toward a "phase one" deal, according to China's Ministry of Commerce spokesperson Gao Feng.

7 Stocks Poised to Rise as Market Enters Best Stretch in 8 Decades

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The November to January period historically offers the strongest stock market returns, and these stocks may be poised to ride that seasonal pattern.

5 Lessons From WeWork’s $40 Billion Meltdown

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The decimation of WeWork's valuation since the start of the year provides investors with valuable lessons on what constitutes value.

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CEO Confidence Plunges to Lowest Since 2008 Crisis in Warning Sign

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S&P 500 CEOs are increasingly pessimistic and are cutting back on spending. As a result, a sharp economic downturn is becoming more likely.

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Winner's Curse Definition

Posted:

The winner's curse is a tendency for the winning bid in an auction to exceed the true value of an item.

Third World Definition

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Third World is a phrase commonly used to describe economically inferior nations.

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Employment-to-Population Ratio Definition

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The employment-to-population ratio is a statistic indicating the ratio of the labor force currently employed to the total working-age population of a region.

Embedded Option Definition

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An embedded option is a component of a financial security that gives the issuer or the holder the right to take a specified action in the future.

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Eurocurrency

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A eurocurrency is a currency deposited by national governments or corporations in banks outside their home market.

Committed Credit Line Definition

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When a financial institution offers a loan balance called a committed credit line, it cannot be suspended without notice.

Cash Discount Definition

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A cash discount may be used by a seller as an incentive to a buyer for paying a bill before the scheduled due date.

Global Investment Presents Opportunity

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While U.S. markets pause, there could be opportunities in international investments, and health care stocks are becoming more attractive.

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Best Personal Loans of November 2019

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Compare the best personal loans on the market across a number of categories including debt consolidation, bad credit and more. Find the right lender for your needs.

Square Earnings: What Happened with SQ

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Square (SQ) reported earnings after market close on November 6. Square delivered earnings and revenue beats. Payment volume grew, albeit more slowly.

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Musawamah Definition

Posted:

Musawamah is an Islamic finance term describing a sale where the seller does not disclose the price paid to create or obtain the good or service.

Emergency Credit Definition

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Emergency credit are government loans given to institutions which lack alternative credit sources. They are colloquially known as "bailout loans."

Ceiling Definition

Posted:

In finance, a ceiling is the maximum permitted level in a financial transaction. The term can be applied to a variety of factors.

Minimum Deposit Definition

Posted:

A minimum deposit is the minimum amount of money required to open an account with a financial institution, such as a bank or brokerage firm.

Waiver of Demand Definition

Posted:

A waiver of demand is an agreement to accept legal responsibility, without being formally notified, in the event of default.

Twenty Percent Rule Definition

Posted:

The twenty percent rule is a convention used by banks requiring debtors to maintain deposits equal to at least 20% of their outstanding loans.

Allonge Definition

Posted:

An allonge is a sheet of paper that is attached to a negotiable instrument, such as a bill of exchange, to provide space for additional endorsements.

Payment Gateway Definition

Posted:

A payment gateway refers to the front-end technology that reads payment cards and sends customer information to the merchant acquiring bank for processing.

Eurobank Definition

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A eurobank is a financial institution that accepts foreign currency denominated deposits and makes foreign currency loans.

Belt and Suspenders Definition

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In finance, "belt and suspenders" is a colloquial phrase used to describe conservative lending practices.

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Rubber Check Definition

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Rubber check is a colloquial term used to describe a written check that does not have the funds available to be cashed by the recipient.

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Bank Examination Definition

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A bank examination is an evaluation of the financial health of a bank. They are primarily concerned with the strength of the bank's balance sheet.

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Lombard Rate Definition

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The Lombard rate is the interest rate charged by central banks when extending short-term loans backed by collateral to commercial banks.

How a Roth IRA Works After Retirement

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Roth IRAs offer retirees some unique advantages in terms of taxes, distributions, and passing on unspent savings to the next generation.

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CFA Institute

Posted:

The CFA Institute is an international organization that serves investment management professionals with educational, ethical and certification programs.

How is cost basis calculated on an inherited asset?

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This cost basis calculation for stocks, property, and other inherited assets will determine the tax you may pay in states that have inheritance taxes.

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Bitcoin Mining, Explained

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Breaking down everything you need to know about Bitcoin mining, from blockchain and block rewards to Proof-of-Work and mining pools.

How Much Do I Need to Retire?

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How much money do you need to retire? That depends on your income and lifestyle. Find out retirement savings by age and answers to "How much do I need to retire?"

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Short Sales vs. Foreclosures: What's the Difference?

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Understand the difference between a short sale and a foreclosure; both result in the loss of a home, either through a sale by the owner or the mortgage holder.

Development Well

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A development well is drilled in a proven area for the production of oil or gas, in contrast to an exploratory well, which is drilled to find oil or gas.

Nvidia Earnings: What to Look For From NVDA

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Nvidia (NVDA) reports fiscal Q3 2020 earnings after market close on November 14, 2019. Can they post strong gross margins for the quarter?

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Social Justice Definition

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Social justice is a concept holding that all people should have equal access to wealth, health, well-being, privileges, and opportunity.

Maintenance Bond Definition

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A maintenance bond is a surety bond purchased by a contractor to protect the owner of a construction project from defects for a certain period.

How $3.4 Trillion in Sideline Cash will Boost Markets

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Mountain of cash: cautious investors have built up a massive cash hoard that could propel stocks yet higher.

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5 Key Retirement Planning Steps Everyone Should Take

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Regardless of your age, taking these five steps will help you build a solid retirement plan.

Kraft Heinz Stock Bottoming Out After Long Downtrend

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Kraft Heinz shares turned sharply higher last week, carving the next leg of a bottoming pattern that could yield a new uptrend.

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CyberArk Extends Breakout After Strong Q3 Earnings

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CyberArk shares moved sharply higher during Wednesday's pre-market session after the company reported better-than-expected results.

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3 Apparel Stocks Looking More Fashionable

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Discover why apparel companies sit positioned to fend off trade war challenges. Monitor these stocks for trading opportunities.

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Walgreens Stock Flying High After Buyout Reports

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Walgreens stock has rallied to a seven-month high after reports that the drug chain is talking to private equity firms about a leveraged buyout.

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Pfizer Beats Earnings as Weekly Chart Stays Positive

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The pharmaceutical giant and Dow component beat earnings estimates for the 11th consecutive quarter.

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Bullion Market Definition

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A bullion market is a market through which buyers and sellers trade gold and silver as well as associated derivatives.

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Are Fundrise's eREITs Right for You?

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Three things to keep in mind when considering investing in Fundrise's eREITs.

Generac Shares Are Charging With Big Buy Signals

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As the fires in California rage, the need for generators is high, and the rush for Generac shares appears to be in motion.

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Xerox Considers $27 Billion HP Takeover: WSJ

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Xerox Holdings Corp. is considering making a cash-and-stock offer for HP Inc., according to The Wall Street Journal.

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How Cannabis Cash Crunch Will Flatten Pot Stocks

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Cannabis stocks have crashed and that's causing problems for pot producers looking to raise cash.

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Why Morgan Stanley Says the 60/40 Portfolio Is Doomed

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Morgan Stanley projects that 60/40 stock/bond portfolio returns over the next 10 years will near 100-year lows, down by half vs. the last 20 years.

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Environmental Impact Statement Definition

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An Environmental Impact Statement is a report addressing the potential effects on the environment of a proposed federal government project.

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Average Indexed Monthly Earnings (AIME) Definition

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Average indexed monthly earnings (AIME) is used to determine the primary insurance amount (PIA) that values an individual's social security benefits.

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Financial Sector Moves Higher as Markets Grow Optimistic

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As financial stocks break out, we look at who won the discount broker battle and consider what comes next for Schwab.

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Hub and Spoke Structure

Posted:

A hub and spoke structure is an investment structure used by an investment company in which several investment vehicles, each remaining individually managed, pool their assets together, contributing to one central investment vehicle.

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Homoskedastic Definition

Posted:

Homoskedastic refers to a condition in which the variance of the error term in a regression model is constant.

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Procter & Gamble Retests Highs After Solid Earnings

Posted:

Procter & Gamble shares moved higher after the company reported stronger-than-expected earnings, but traders will be keeping an eye on these levels.

Downstream Definition

Posted:

Downstream operations are functions regarding oil and gas that happen after the production phase, through to the point of sale.

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Certificate in Investment Performance Measurement (CIPM) Definition

Posted:

The Certificate in Investment Performance Measurement (CIPM) signifies competency in the evaluation of the investment performance of investment firms.

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3 Charts Suggest Agriculture Commodities Are Headed Lower

Posted:

Nearby resistance levels on the charts suggest that key agricultural commodities could be gearing up to make a move lower again.

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Lodging Stocks Could Rally After a Trade Deal

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Marriott stock is trading lower after the hotel group reported a mixed quarter, while rival Hilton looks set to challenge July's all-time high.

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Reference Equity

Posted:

The underlying equity that an investor is seeking price movement protection for.

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Independent Insurance Adjuster

Posted:

Although the name might suggest otherwise, independent insurance adjusters work for the insurance company but through a third party that specialized in homeowners or other types of insurance claims.

Commodity ETF Definition

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A commodity ETF is an exchange-traded fund that invests in physical commodities, such as futures contracts.

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The Complete Guide to Money Market Deposit Accounts

Posted:

A money market deposit account (MMDA) is a savings account with unique features not found in most savings accounts.

Dual Currency Bond

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A dual currency bond is a debt instrument in which the coupon and principal payments are made in two different currencies.

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What Is Private Wealth Management?

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Understand what private wealth management is from the perspective of both the private client and the private wealth manager.

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Variable-Rate Demand Bond Definition

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A variable-rate demand bond is a municipal bond with floating coupon payments that are adjusted at specific intervals.

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Student Loan Forgiveness Definition

Posted:

Under certain circumstances, part or all of your federally backed student loans can be discharged or forgiven.

How Bearish Corporate Earnings Are Broadening the Bull Market Rally

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Despite falling Q3 profits thus far, an unusually large number of S&P 500 companies are beating estimates and fueling the bull market.

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What Happens to Campaign Contributions After Elections?

Posted:

Learn how campaign contributions are used for when the candidate is no longer running.

How an IRA Works After Retirement

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You've read a lot about saving for your future retirement with IRAs. But what happens to the IRA when the future is here, and you actually retire?

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Starbucks Stock: Capital Structure Analysis

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Discover the capital structure analysis for Starbucks Corporation (SBUX), and learn how it generated a 47% increase in enterprise value in 2015.

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10 Stocks Seen as End-of-Year Bargains as Tax-Loss Selling Surges

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Stocks that were big losers in 2019 should attract heavy tax-loss selling, pushing their prices down yet more and creating some potential bargains.

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6 Stocks That Can Win the Pay TV Streaming Wars

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Video streaming services are proliferating rapidly, with a growing number of deep pocketed players getting into the game. A shakeout is inevitable.

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The Two Top Livestock ETFs

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Discover the basic information on the two primary exchange-traded funds that offer investors exposure to investments in the livestock market.

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How Oil Cos. Treat Reserves on a Balance Sheet

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Oil reserves are estimated quantities of crude oil that have a high degree of certainty.

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Credit Inquiry Definition

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A credit inquiry is a request by an institution for credit report information from a credit reporting agency.

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Understanding Credit Card Balance Transfers

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Before you transfer a balance to a credit card with a lower interest rate, understand how it affects new purchases and other fine-print traps that can cost you.

What Happens When Your Credit Card Expires?

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Find out why credit cards have expiration dates, and why updating your credit card once in a while is a good idea.

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How Credit Card Companies Make Money

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Credit card companies reap rich rewards for extending credit to consumers. Here's how.

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Backflush Costing Definition

Posted:

Backflush costing is a product costing approach, used in just-in-time (JIT) operating environments, in which costing is delayed until goods are finished

How the Firestone Credit Card Works: Benefits and Rewards

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The Firestone credit card offers customers a way to finance car repairs and new tires, as well as other benefits and rewards.

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When a Business Temporarily Closes After a Shutdown point: Pros and Cons

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Learn about the differences between a shutdown point and going out of business — and why it might make sense to shut down.

Pro Athletes and Their Bad Money Habits

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They made plenty of money, but they spent more. Here's a look back at Vince Young of the NFL, John Daly of the PGA, and Dennis Rodman of the NBA.

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Chief Risk Officer (CRO)

Posted:

A chief risk officer is an executive who identifies and mitigates events that could threaten a company.

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The 4 Biggest Hedge Fund Scandals

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Learn about major scandals at hedge funds including the Madoff investment scandal and insider trading cases at SAC Capital, LTCM, and the Galleon Group.

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Options for When You Can No Longer Afford Your Car

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If you have more car than you can afford, here are multiple ways to deal with this "debt on wheels."

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Bitcoin's Price History

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Read about the volatility in the price of Bitcoin. Learn how the currency has seen major spikes and crashes, as well as differences in prices across exchanges.

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Avoiding Unnecessary Probate Costs

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Avoiding probate allows the deceased's property to be distributed to the designated person at a certain time without substantial costs.

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Matching Contribution Definition

Posted:

A matching contribution is a type of contribution an employer chooses to make to his or her employee's employer-sponsored retirement plan.

Maxing Out Your 401(k) and What to Do Next

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Max out your 401(k) each year, and be sure to get your 401(k) employer match, if you have one. And for you super savers, here are other ways to save for retirement.

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7 Financial Lessons to Master by Age 30

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Once you hit your 30s, it is time to get serious about your finances and money skills. Here are the top financial lessons you need to master this decade.

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Bitcoin vs. Ethereum: What's the Difference?

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Etherum has risen in popularity but is still dwarfed by Bitcoin in terms of market share, although the two are supposed to be complementary.

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What Is Overstock's Cryptocurrency tZERO?

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E-commerce giant Overstock launched its own cryptocurrency called tZERO in Dec. 2017 and here's how it's affected the stock.

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6 REITs That Pay Dividends Monthly

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Income-oriented investors prioritize monthly dividend payments. Here are six real estate investment trusts that meet that criterion.

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The 7 Biggest Canadian Energy Companies (IMO.TO, TRP)

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Read about the largest seven Canadian energy companies as measured by market capitalization, and learn more about their energy operations.

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When did Facebook go public? (FB)

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With a peak market capitalization of over $104 billion, Facebook, Inc. had one of the largest and most anticipated IPOs in history on May 18, 2012.

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Sponsor Definition

Posted:

A sponsor can be a range of providers and entities supporting the goals and objectives of an individual or company.

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When is managerial accounting appropriate?

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Understand the difference between managerial accounting and financial accounting, and learn common scenarios in which managerial accounting is appropriate.

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Annual Turnover Definition

Posted:

Annual turnover is the percentage rate at which a mutual fund or exchange-traded fund replaces its investment holdings on an annual basis.

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Early Social Security: When Does it Make Sense to Start Early?

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Early Social Security means you start taking benefits before full retirement age. The checks are bigger if you wait, but sometimes early Social Security makes sense.

Top 5 Shareholders of Primerica (PRI)

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The five largest shareholders in Primerica and the size of their stakes.

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Regulation Q

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Regulation Q is a federal rule that outlines a variety of capital requirements for regulated institutions in the United States

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Will Elon Musk's SpaceX Go Public?

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Learn about Elon Musk's rocket and spacecraft company SpaceX, its products and clients, and the future possibility of an initial public offering (IPO).

What to Expect in the Markets Next Week

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The trade war continues. How will trade pressure and the General Motors strike affect auto sales?

Subprime Credit Definition

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Subprime credit refers to loans, usually offered at rates above the prime rate, made to a borrower with a low credit rating,

Rent Guarantee Insurance Definition

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Rent guarantee insurance is a risk-management product that protects landlords against loss if a tenant defaults on rent payments.

Trading Forex With Bitcoin: How Does It Work?

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We look at ways to trade forex with bitcoin and the pitfalls in doing so.

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The 5 Most Important Lessons From the 1929 Crash That Matter Today

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The Great Crash of 1929 took place in late October of that year, and its 90th anniversary is a time to recall its lessons for today.