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Saturday, March 14, 2020

Business News, Updates

Business News, Updates


The US has reported 51 coronavirus deaths among more than 2,500 cases. Here's what we know about the US patients.

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 11:25 AM PDT

Life care centerDavid Ryder/Getty Images

  • Fifty-one people in the US have died from the coronavirus: 37 in Washington state, five in California, four in Louisiana, three in Florida, and one each in New York, Colorado, New Jersey, South Dakota, Georgia, and Kansas.
  • The US has reported over 2,400 coronavirus cases across at least 49 states and Washington, DC.  
  • The World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic on Wednesday.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The US has reported 51 deaths from the coronavirus as of Friday: 37 in Washington state, five in California, four in Louisiana, three in Florida, and one each in New York, Colorado, New Jersey, South Dakota, Georgia, and Kansas.

The country's case tally has passed 2,500, with cases reported in at least 49 states and Washington, DC. 

The World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic on Wednesday, and on Friday, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency in response to the pandemic.

On Wednesday, March 11, Trump has announced a 30-day travel ban for people traveling from Europe, excluding the United Kingdom. US citizens and permanent residents and some of their immediate family will be exempt.

Because county- and state-level health authorities are reporting the latest case counts before the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does, Business Insider is tallying those local reports and updating this story live to give a comprehensive picture of where — and to what degree — the coronavirus is spreading in the US.

 

 

The virus, which originated in Wuhan, China, in December, causes a respiratory disease known as COVID-19. Over 5,700 people have died and over 153,000 others have been infected, many of whom were in China. Cases have been recorded in more than 110 countries.

For the latest global case totals, death tolls, and travel information, see Business Insider's live updates here.

Here's everything we know about the coronavirus in the US — in the list below, states are ordered by their number of cases.

Note: This post was last updated at 3:00 a.m. ET on Saturday, March 14.

Fifty-one people have died from the coronavirus on US soil.

Suzi Pratt/Getty

Washington has reported 37 deaths. The first — a man in his 50s who had chronic underlying health issues — was reported February 29 at EvergreenHealth, a hospital in Kings County, Washington. Two of the Washington patients died February 26, but their diagnoses were confirmed posthumously on March 10, making them the earliest known coronavirus fatalities in the US. 

California's four deaths included a woman in her 60s in Santa Clara County, a woman who was treated at Kaiser Permanente in Placer County, and a woman in her 90s from Sacramento County.

Florida's three were in Lee County, Santa Rosa County, and Orange County.

New Jersey announced its first death on Tuesday: a man in his 60s.

South Dakota confirmed its first death on Tuesday as well, also a man in his 60s, though the exact cause of death has yet to be confirmed. 

Georgia and Kansas both recorded their first death on Thursday, and Colorado announced its first death on Friday in El Paso County.

New York also announced its first death Saturday



One person who died in California was likely exposed to the coronavirus on the Grand Princess cruise ship. That passenger had disembarked, but at least 21 people who were on board in early March tested positive.

Princess Cruises

The ship has unloaded passengers at the Port of Oakland. Sixty-two people on board had been on the last voyage with the person who died in California.

Two passengers and 19 crew members have tested positive, but it is still unclear how many of those people are from the US, so they do not yet factor into the country's total number of cases.

The healthy US passengers will be quarantined for 14 days at military bases in California, Texas, or Georgia. Crew members — including some who tested positive — are staying on the ship.



Washington has confirmed 569 cases of the virus and 37 deaths. More than 50 residents of a nursing facility in King County have tested positive.

Reuters

Nineteen of the Washington deaths are linked to the long-term care facility, called Life Care Center.

Most of the cases in Washington have occurred in King, Snohomish, Spokane, and Pierce counties, as well as several others.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee declared a state of emergency on February 29. On Wednesday, he banned gatherings of more than 250 people.




See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro says he tested negative for the coronavirus following reports that he tested positive

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 11:18 AM PDT

Trump BolsonaroAlex Brandon/AP

This story is breaking. Check back for updates.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro on Friday said he tested negative for the novel coronavirus, after reports suggested that he tested positive.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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THE PAYMENTS ECOSYSTEM: The biggest shifts and trends driving short- and long-term growth and shaping the future of the industry

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 11:05 AM PDT

payments ecosystem 2019 updateBusiness Insider Intelligence

The power dynamics in the payments industry are changing as businesses and consumers shift dollars from cash and checks to digital payment methods. Cards dominate the in-store retail channel, but mobile wallets like Apple Pay are seeing a rapid uptick in usage.

At the same time, e-commerce will chip away at brick-and-mortar retail as smartphones attract a rising share of digital shopping. Digital peer-to-peer (P2P) apps are supplanting cash in the day-to-day lives of users across generations as they become more appealing and useful than ever.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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How much money you need to retire at 65 and live on investment income alone till 90

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 11:04 AM PDT

retired couplebernardbodo/Getty

  • To retire at 65 and live on investment income of $100,000 a year, you'd need to have $2.5 million invested on the day you leave work.
  • If you reduced your annual spending target to $65,000, you'd need a starting balance of about $1.6 million in a taxable investment account.
  • Brian Fry, a certified financial planner at Safe Landing Financial, recommends an asset allocation of 60% stocks and 40% bonds to ensure the account's growth and provide a steady income for decades.
  • To arrive at these figures, Fry made assumptions about the retiree's investments and tax treatments, which are listed at the end of this article.
  • Read more personal finance coverage »

Americans may be working longer than ever, but many younger workers still aim to commence their golden years around age 65, a 2018 Gallup poll found.

To find out exactly how much you'd need to invest to retire at 65, we consulted Brian Fry, a certified financial planner and the founder of Safe Landing Financial.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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A couple who retired early with $1.5 million despite never earning 6 figures uses a 'bucket' system for their money so they'll never run out

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 11:02 AM PDT

early retirement coupleHans Huber/Getty

  • A 59-year-old retiree who was featured on the blog ESI Money said he and his wife left the working world two years ago with more than $1.5 million saved and invested.
  • The retiree said they decided to separate their money into three proverbial "buckets" to make sure they don't outlive their savings.
  • The first bucket is cash to tide them over until they begin claiming Social Security; the second bucket is their after-tax investments; the third bucket holds long-term growth IRAs.
  • They have planned to draw on the money in that order — cash first, then after-tax investments, and lastly, retirement savings accounts.
  • Read more personal finance coverage »

For many early retirees, the biggest challenge is finding a way to keep savings intact through decades of spending and very little earning.

One couple who retired early devised a plan to separate their money into three proverbial "buckets" so they'd never run out, the 59-year-old husband recently shared on the personal-finance blog ESI Money. The man and his wife, 62, never earned six-figure salaries individually, but managed to retire two years ago with just over $1.5 million in cash and investments. They promptly sold their house in Florida and moved into their second home in the rural Smokey Mountains, he said.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The federal government has suspended interest on student loans as the economy sputters. Here's what to do with that unexpected cash.

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:55 AM PDT

man opening walletEva-Katalin/Getty Images

 

With closures and cancellations happening across the US this week in response to the spreading coronavirus, many Americans are likely to face financial burdens in the very near future as their incomes dwindle. 

In an effort to help ease that burden, President Donald Trump announced in a press conference on Friday that the interest on federal student-loan payments would be suspended "until further notice" while the US deals with the ongoing coronavirus crisis.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The secret history of McDonald's Filet-O-Fish, which was almost killed from the menu before becoming one of the chain's staple sandwiches

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:40 AM PDT

McDonald's Filet-O-Fish Fast Food Fish Sandwich 8Hollis Johnson

  • McDonald's Filet-O-Fish sandwich — the first non-hamburger item added to the fast food giant's menu — went nationwide in 1965.
  • It was the brainchild of Cincinnati-based McDonald's franchise owner Lou Groen.
  • Groen came up with the idea when he discovered that the Catholic practice of abstaining from meat on Fridays was hurting his business.
  • At first, McDonald's CEO Ray Kroc hated the idea of "stinking up" the restaurant with fish.
  • He reconsidered when the Filet-O-Fish trounced Kroc's "Hula Burger" sandwich in a head-to-head contest.


Believe it or not, the Filet-O-Fish almost missed the menu.

Nowadays, the sandwich is iconic, and it's responsible for a whole bunch of piscine imitators. Business Insider's Mary Hanbury reported that the Filet-O-Fish is a massive hit during Lent, when many Catholics fast and abstain from eating meat on Fridays.

It's one of President Donald Trump's favorites, too. He's known to put away two of the fish sandwiches at a time, along with two Big Macs and a large chocolate shake.

But the sandwich's enduring success contrasts with its floundering start. Former McDonald's CEO Ray Kroc initially thought that he had bigger fish to fry when Cincinnati franchise owner Lou Groen first proposed the idea in 1962. 

Here's a look at the early history of the Filet-O-Fish, which owes its briny existence to Cincinnati-based Roman Catholics and the fact that most people don't find pineapple-and-cheese sandwiches all that appealing:

After seeing a McDonald's ad in a magazine, Groen opened his first golden-arched restaurant in Cincinnati in 1959. He also purchased the franchise rights for the city and northern Kentucky.

Aaron Bernstein/Reuters

Source: Business Insider, "Historic Restaurants of Cincinnati: The Queen City's Tasty History"



McDonald's was far from the only burger joint on the block in those days, and the market was crowded and competitive.

Yves Herman/Reuters

Source: Business Insider, "Historic Restaurants of Cincinnati: The Queen City's Tasty History"



Before the Second Vatican Council took place in the mid-1960s, Roman Catholics were supposed to abstain from eating meat on Fridays.

Mark Baker/AP Images

Source: The Catholic Telegraph, The List Show TV, The Baltimore Sun




See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: I compared fish sandwiches from 4 major fast-food chains, and all of them were terrible except one

I'm a senior at Harvard University who thought I had 2 months until graduation. When we heard we had five days left, my friends and I staged our own ceremony.

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:35 AM PDT

Clifford Courvoisier and his Harvard classmates tossing their graduation Alyssa Truong

  • Clifford Scott Courvoisier is a senior at Harvard University from Cloudcroft, New Mexico, a small mountain town with a population of less than one thousand. 
  • After Harvard shut down over coronavirus fears, students were given five days to evacuate, cutting Courvoisier and his classmates' senior spring off.
  • Courvoisier and his friends made the most of their final five days as seniors on campus, hitting their favorite hangout spots and hitting bucket-list items.
  • They also had a makeshift graduation ceremony on Harvard Yard.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

This is the way a world ends: not with a bang, but a zipper.

When I went to sleep in my dorm room on March 9, 2020, I was a senior at Harvard University. I had two months left of my undergraduate career — two months to continue to "grow in wisdom" as the words above Harvard's Dexter Gate urged me to do; two months to spend with my lifelong friends before senior week and the devastating goodbyes.

But I awoke on the morning of Tuesday, March 10, to the sound of a zipper from my common room. Normally, this would not be cause for alarm — except I know my roommate very well. He carries a zipper-less briefcase and wears zipper-less coats. If I was hearing a zipper, it had to be coming from a suitcase — and, if it was coming from a suitcase, then something was very wrong.

That morning I learned that I, along with 1,600 of my fellow seniors, would not be finishing our final year on Harvard's campus. In the wake of the rapid spread of COVID-19, a strain of coronavirus, all university classes were to be moved online, and everyone was required to vacate their dorms by Sunday, March 15.

We were supposed to have two months. We now found ourselves with five days.

Alyssa Truong

Overnight, a fog descended over the campus. The instant reaction was shocking. Classrooms all over campus were filled with the sobs of students who wanted to continue studying, but had become too overwhelmed by the brutal reality of their situations. Harvard professors across disciplines expressed sympathy, disappointment, confusion, and even outrage at the suddenness and extremity of the university's actions. And there is still a tremendous amount of ambiguity surrounding future circumstances.

This sudden, rapid upheaval has had a profound impact on me and those closest to me. My friend group is an interesting one. Many of us met on the first day of our freshman year as roommates and have lived together — or in close proximity — ever since. We are an incredibly diverse group of students, some international and faced with a terrifying reality: the inability to return home.

At this uncertain time, there is a tendency to focus on the negative — to despair, deny, pity, and get angry. In the early hours of March 10, we all certainly felt compelled to indulge in those emotions.



But we didn't have time to wallow

Alyssa Truong

With the five-day deadline hanging over our heads, we decided to focus on the positive, and to do what we could to make the most of our time left together. Indeed, the unfortunate circumstances have only bolstered our sense of compassion and togetherness.

The first day we spent visiting our favorite places and doing all the little things that we had neglected to do in our time here. Whether it was getting ice cream at a small corner store, or playing foosball in a common room, we retraced the familiar and experimented with the new to make the most of what little time we had left.

Yet, after it all, something still felt missing. In order to walk away and properly say goodbye, my friends and I needed closure.



We needed to graduate

Joanna Bafia

It had become clear to us that, considering the circumstances, we would likely not have a graduation ceremony on campus.

We decided to create our own. 

There are two significant gates leading into Harvard Yard: the historic area where freshmen live, and the famous statue of John Harvard resides. The first is known as Johnston Gate, and it is the one almost all freshmen pass through when they enter Harvard University for the first time.




See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: Columbia, Harvard, Ohio State, and other major US colleges and universities that have switched to remote classes to prevent the spread of the coronavirus

Trump's coronavirus travel ban initially excluded countries where he has golf courses struggling for business

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:32 AM PDT

trump turnberryLeon Neal/Getty

  • President Donald Trump's new coronavirus-related travel restrictions on Europe initially did not extend to the two European countries where he has golf courses: the UK and Ireland.
  • The 30-day travel ban announced Wednesday only targeted 26 countries that are part of a visa-free travel area known as the Schengen Area. The UK and Ireland are not part of that zone.
  • Trump has two properties in the UK — Trump Turnberry and Trump International Golf Links in Scotland — as well as one in Doonbeg, Ireland. All are struggling financially.
  • A day after the travel ban took effect Friday, the Trump administration announced the travel restrictions would be extended to the UK and Ireland starting on Monday at midnight.
  • As of Saturday, the total number of European countries affected by the travel restrictions was 28. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.
 

 

Hours after the World Health Organization declared the novel coronavirus a pandemic, President Donald Trump on Wednesday night announced a 30-day travel ban on most of Europe. But among the countries he initially excluded were two where he has hotels and golf courses that have been struggling financially: the UK and Ireland.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The US has a shortage of coronavirus tests, so the ultra-wealthy are paying concierge doctors to do their own

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:32 AM PDT

coronavirus testing labArkadiusz Stankiewicz/Agencja Gazeta/via REUTERS

The day after the WHO declared the novel coronavirus a pandemic, a Los Angeles resident woke up with a 104-degree fever and feared he would become its latest victim. 

Had the man gone to a hospital to get tested, he likely could have been turned away like countless others fearful that they were infected. The United States is facing a shortage of testing materials that has led to it falling behind every other developed nation in the rate of tests performed per capita. As a result, the Center for Disease Control requires that a patient meet a series of strict criteria before being tested for the virus. Despite having traveled to Italy, the country with the second-highest number of coronavirus fatalities behind China, he still may have been ruled ineligible because the trip was over a month ago.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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PRESENTING: How American businesses are handling production delays, heightened demand, and economic fallout amid the coronavirus pandemic

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:30 AM PDT

Wesley Kang cofounder of nimble madeCourtesy of Wesley Kang

The coronavirus outbreak has shut down factories and workplaces worldwide, impacting the global supply chain at every level. Businesses in the US are are scrambling to make sales and meet demand, as more people practice "social distancing" and avoid public spaces and mass transportation. 

The effects of the pandemic are impacting the largest companies and smallest startups alike. 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Royal Caribbean is halting new cruises for the next 30 days in the US amid coronavirus threat

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:24 AM PDT

Royal CaribbeanThomas Layer/Associated Press

  • Amid the coronavirus pandemic, cruise holding company Royal Caribbean announced Friday afternoon that it would suspend new cruises disembarking from the US for the next 30 days. 
  • Cruises that have already disembarked, or will disembark before midnight on Friday, will continue.
  • International cruises are also not affected.  
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the mega-cruise corporation Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. is voluntarily suspending cruises in the United States for the next 30 days, starting March 13 at midnight.

This will affect Royal Caribbean and Celebrity Cruises, both of which are wholly owned by the Miami-based holding company. The company also partially owns a number of smaller, Europe-based cruise companies, which will not be affected by the US-based cruise suspension. 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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All the times Trump risked exposing himself to coronavirus as his advisers urge people his age to be extremely cautious

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:12 AM PDT

President Donald Trump speaks before a dinner with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro at Mar-a-Lago, Saturday, March 7, 2020, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)Associated Press

  • President Donald Trump has taken few personal precautions as coronavirus continues to spread across the US. 
  • Trump, who is 73, in recent days has been in the vicinity of three people who were confirmed to have coronavirus and several people who interacted with infected individuals. 
  • The World Health Organization on Wednesday declared the novel coronavirus a pandemic.
  • After repeated questions about his level of exposure, Trump on Saturday announced he had been tested for the novel coronavirus.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has sought to paint a rosy picture for the country as the coronavirus outbreak spreads, downplaying its potential impact and routinely contradicting top government experts. 

And he's exhibited little to no personal caution as public health officials warn that the worst is yet to come with the outbreak. At 73, Trump is at higher risk for getting a more serious form of novel coronavirus and his job involves lots of meetings and air travel. The CDC has advised Americans over 60 to stock up on foods and medications; the most serious cases seem to be for seniors 80 years and older.

There have been several instances in which Trump may have risked exposing himself to coronavirus, which he was tested for Saturday after days of questions about this exposure. Here's a rundown. 

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro was tested for coronavirus. He was with Trump at his Mar-a-Lago resort over the weekend. The two shook hands and sat side-by-side at dinner. Bolsonaro's press secretary has tested positive for coronavirus.

Alex Brandon/AP

Source: Insider



Bolsonaro's coronavirus test came back negative, though some reports initially suggested he tested positive. The Brazilian president announced the test was negative via social media on Friday, but Brazil's Estado de S. Paulo newspaper subsequently reported he would be retested.

Associated Press

Source: Insider; Reuters



Fabio Wajngarten, Bolsonaro's press secretary, has tested positive for the coronavirus. He was photographed standing next to Trump, but Insider did not attain rights to use that image.

Alex Brandon/AP


See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The US extends European travel ban to UK and Ireland to contain coronavirus

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:11 AM PDT

mike penceCarolyn Kaster/AP

  • Vice President Mike Pence announced that the US was suspending travel from the United Kingdom and Ireland in an effort to address the coronavirus outbreak. 
  • Pence said at a Saturday press conference that the restrictions would take effect at midnight, March 13. 
  • Americans and legal residents would still be allowed to travel from the countries to the US, but would be funneled through specific airports and subject to screening guidelines.
  • The announcement came days after Trump said his administration was instituting a ban on travel to the US from 26 European countries that excluded Britain and Ireland, but he was considering expanding because "numbers have gone up fairly precipitously over the last 24 hours."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The United States is expanding travel restrictions to include the United Kingdom and Ireland in an effort to cut down on the novel coronavirus outbreak. 

Vice President Mike Pence said during Saturday press conference that the White House Coronavirus Task Force could confirm that the two additional bans would take effect at midnight, March 13. 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Trump announces he was tested for coronavirus and is awaiting results

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:06 AM PDT

trump coronavirusAlex Brandon/AP Photo

  • President Donald Trump on Saturday said he was recently tested for the novel coronavirus and is awaiting results.
  • Trump's announcement came after the White House physician released a memo on Friday saying the president did not need to be tested despite potential exposure from two individuals at Mar-a-Lago last week.
  • The president said his temperature was taken before entering the Press Briefing Room and it was "totally normal."
  • Vice President Pence said he and his wife have not been tested for the virus.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

At a press conference on Saturday, President Donald Trump told reporters he had been tested for the novel coronavirus, which causes a disease known as COVID-19, and is awaiting results of the test.

The announcement came after a White House physician released a memo saying the president did not need to be tested or quarantined despite potential exposure to the virus.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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CULTIVATED: Cuts at MedMen, the race to enter Canada's edible market, and more

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 10:05 AM PDT

The White House is now checking the temperatures of any 'individuals who are in close contact' with President Trump and VP Pence

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 09:46 AM PDT

Trump coronavirus handshake.JPGJonathan Ernst/Reuters

  • The White House announced Saturday all people 'in close contact' with President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence would have their temperatures taken out of "an abundance of caution." 
  • A day before the announcement, the president had shaken hands and touched other officials at a press conference at the White House. 
  • One person was turned away from the White House on Saturday because their temperature was 99.9º, CNN reported.
  • The president said he had his temperature taken before entering the Press Briefing Room and said it was "totally normal."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Ahead of a press conference about the novel coronavirus on Saturday, the White House announced it would be testing members of the press and anyone 'in close contact' with both President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence. 

"Out of an abundance of caution, temperature checks are now being performed on any individuals who are in close contact with the President and Vice President," White House spokesperson Judd Deere said in a statement to reporters on Saturday, according to Axios

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The coronavirus bill will provide free testing, benefits, paid leave. Here's everything you need to know about it.

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 09:35 AM PDT

pelosi coronavirus billAP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

  • The House of Representatives passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act in the government's first step to providing widespread financial support for workers and families affected by the coronavirus outbreak.
  • The bill includes several measures intended to provide financial relief including increased free testing, benefits, and paid sick, family, and medical leave.
  • The bill was passed early Saturday, but hit a roadblock when Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did not call lawmakers for a vote over the weekend. 
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The House of Representatives passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act early Saturday morning in the first widespread action by President Donald Trump's administration to support those affected by the coronavirus outbreak.

The bill includes several measures designed to provide financial relief to Americans as cities and states across the country see businesses suffering as consumers avoid public places.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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30 Big Tech Predictions for 2020

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 09:33 AM PDT

Digital transformation has just begun. 30BigTechPredictionsfor2020

Not a single industry is safe from the unstoppable wave of digitization that is sweeping through finance, retail, healthcare, and more.

In 2020, we expect to see even more transformative developments that will change our businesses, careers, and lives.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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I asked women what advice they'd give their younger working selves. Thousands responded, revealing a need for more places where women can share their experiences.

Posted: 14 Mar 2020 08:00 AM PDT

women workingMorsa Images/Getty

  • Amy Nelson is the founder and CEO of Riveter, a coworking startup with locations sprouting up across the US.
  • She addressed her fellow working women on Twitter with the question: "If you could give your younger working self any advice, what would you say?"
  • The responses they gave soon numbered in the hundreds, offering insight on everything from applying for your dream job to not overthinking starting a family.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

I asked the women of Twitter for their candid advice on how to navigate work. The outpouring of wisdom and advice was profound, as was their desire to share their stories.

Earlier this week, I sent a tweet asking, "To my working women friends: If you could give your younger working self any advice, what would you say?" in search of inspiration before afternoon meetings (and because, let's be honest, most of our Twitter feeds can use a distraction from the never-ending saga of the 2020 presidential election.)

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: The first female coach in MLB history didn't realize she had been interviewing for the job for a month before the Giants offered it to her

READ MORE: 13 female founders who self-funded their businesses share their top advice for startup success

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