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Thursday, February 13, 2020

How to of the Day

How to of the Day


How to Make Chocolate Dipped Strawberries

Posted: 13 Feb 2020 04:00 PM PST

These delicious, attractive treats combine the best of fresh fruit and rich chocolate. The process is easy as long as you are cautious and patient. Melting chocolate can be finicky, but keep to low heat and all will be well.

[Edit]Ingredients

  • About 45 fresh strawberries
  • 8 oz (225 grams) chocolate

Optional:

  • 2 tsp (10 mL) unsalted butter
  • Chopped nuts or sprinkles
  • White chocolate

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Preparing the Strawberries

  1. Throw away damaged strawberries. Discard any strawberries that show signs of damage:[1]

    • Mushy or leaking juice
    • Large white or green areas
    • Dry, brown caps instead of green
    • You can use strawberries with missing caps and stems, but they won't last as long.
  2. Wash the strawberries. Fill a colander with the strawberries. Rinse under cool, running water. Gently shake the colander to clean all sides of the strawberries.[2]

    • Don't wash the strawberries more than an hour in advance. They spoil quickly once washed.
  3. Pat dry with paper towels. Even a drop of water can make the chocolate grainy and unpleasant. Pat dry, then space the strawberries out on dry paper towels to finish air drying. Leave them at room temperature to avoid condensation from the fridge.[3]

  4. Skewer the strawberries (optional). Push a toothpick into each strawberry cap. You can skip this if the stems are still attached.

  5. Cover a baking sheet with wax paper. Parchment paper will work as well. Aluminum foil will prevent sticking just as well, but may leave a pattern on the chocolate strawberries.

[Edit]Melting the Chocolate

  1. Choose high-quality chocolate. Besides the taste, cheap chocolate may not melt and harden evenly. Semisweet, bittersweet, or dark chocolate is easier to melt than milk and white chocolate.[4]
    Make Chocolate Strawberries Step 6 Version 4.jpg
    • Use chocolate chips, or chop bars into even, ¼ inch (6 mm) pieces.
    • "Candy melts" are extra-easy to use, but usually don't taste as good as real chocolate.[5] If using a candy melt, follow the instructions on the label.
  2. Add butter (optional). This makes the chocolate smoother and easier to use as a dip. Mix in 2 teaspoons (10 milliliters) unsalted butter for every 8 ounces (225 grams) chocolate.[6] Never use more than this, or the water in the butter could ruin the chocolate's texture.

    • Shortening has no liquid, so it will never ruin the chocolate. However, it should only be added after the chocolate has melted.[7]
  3. Melt in a double boiler. You can make one of these at home by placing a stainless steel or heat-safe glass bowl over an ordinary pan. Fill the pan with an inch or two (2.5–5 cm) of water, but make sure it doesn't touch the bottom of the bowl.[8] Bring the water to a simmer, then add chocolate to the bowl and stir until melted.

    • Use the lowest heat setting possible to keep the water simmering. Chocolate melts at low temperatures, and can separate if heated too high.
  4. Use a microwave instead. Be aware that this method comes with a high risk of damaged chocolate. It should only be used for small amounts of dark or bittersweet chocolate. Set the microwave to defrost or the lowest power setting. Microwave the bowl of chocolate for 30 seconds, then take out and stir. Repeat in 15–30 second intervals until fully melted. Let stand 30 seconds, then stir one last time.[9]
    Make Chocolate Strawberries Step 9 Version 2.jpg
    • Melted chocolate may still look shiny and hard, and will not feel hot. You'll have to give it a stir to test for melting.
  5. Let the chocolate cool slightly. Leave the chocolate at room temperature for a couple minutes. It's easiest to dip strawberries in chocolate that's at around 100ºF (38ºC). This is roughly human body temperature, so it will feel tepid.
    Make Chocolate Strawberries Step 10 Version 3.jpg

[Edit]Dipping and Storage

  1. Dip the strawberries. Hold each strawberry by the stem or using a toothpick. Dip it into the melted chocolate, nearly up to the green cap. As you pull it out, give it a small shake. This fills in gaps in the chocolate and leaves a smooth line. Finish by rotating the strawberry to let excess chocolate drip off.[10]

  2. Lay on the prepared sheet. Place the dipped strawberries upside-down on the baking sheet covered in wax paper. Space them so they don't touch, or they'll stick together.

  3. Decorate the strawberries (optional). Sprinkle chopped nuts or sprinkles over the chocolate while it is still soft. Or, if you'd like to add a classic white chocolate drizzle, refrigerate the strawberries first. Melt the white chocolate the same way as before, then drizzle it over the hardened chocolate using a fork.

  4. Refrigerate for 15–30 minutes. Leave them in the refrigerator until the chocolate hardens completely. This should minimize the chance of white fat "blooming" to the surface.
    Make Chocolate Strawberries Step 14 Version 3.jpg
    • The chocolate is still safe to eat if it does bloom. You may wish to decorate it as described above, in order to hide the white surface.
  5. Store or serve immediately. These are best served the same day they are made. If storing them longer term, you have a few options:[11]
    Make Chocolate Strawberries Step 15 Version 3.jpg
    • Room temperature: Hold flavor best, but only lasts 2–3 days. Keep covered but not in airtight container. May become limp. Hot temperatures will cause white fat blooms.
    • Refrigerator: Keeps for 5–7 days. Lay a paper towel at the base of a container and sprinkle with baking soda, then add berries and cover. This absorbs moisture, preventing sugar in the chocolate from forming white crystals.
    • Freezer: Best within 3 months, but keeps indefinitely. Chocolate must cover 100% of the strawberry to lock in juices. Freeze separated on a flat sheet first, to prevent sticking together.

[Edit]Video

[Edit]Tips

  • These taste best if eaten within 24 hours. See the instructions above for storage advice if keeping them longer.
  • If you are making a large amount of chocolate strawberries, it may be worth your time to temper the chocolate between melting and dipping. This eliminates the chance of white "bloom," but can be tedious and difficult.

[Edit]Warnings

  • Warn children about skewers.

[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]References



[Edit]Quick Summary

How to Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice

Posted: 13 Feb 2020 08:00 AM PST

Sticky rice has a unique texture and flavor. It is used in many Japanese and Thai dishes. Unfortunately, it is not always easy to find. There are ways to cook regular, non-sticky rice so that it becomes somewhat stickier. This article will give you a few tips on how to cook regular, non-sticky rice so it becomes more sticky. It will also give you two recipes on how to make two popular "sticky rice" dishes, but with regular rice instead.

[Edit]Ingredients

[Edit]Ingredients for Making Regular Rice Stickier

  • 1 cup (200 grams) to 1 ½ cups (300 grams) rice
  • 2 cups (450 milliliters) water
  • Few tablespoons extra water

[Edit]Ingredients for Sushi Rice[1]

  • 1 cup (200 grams) to 1 ½ cups (300 grams) rice
  • 2 cups (450 milliliters) water
  • 4 tablespoons rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon salt

[Edit]Ingredients for Coconut Milk Sticky Rice[2]

Makes 4 servings

  • 1 cup (200 grams) to 1 ½ cups (300 grams) rice
  • 2 cups (450 milliliters) water
  • 1 ½ cups (337.50 milliliters) coconut milk
  • 1 cup (225 grams) white sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Sauce

  • ½ cup (112.50 milliliters) coconut milk
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon tapioca starch
  • 3 mangos, peeled and sliced
  • 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds (optional)

[Edit]Steps

  1. Know what to expect from these recipes. There is no real substitute for sticky rice; it is a type of rice (like brown rice) and not a dish (like fried rice). The flavor and texture of these recipes will be different because you are using regular rice. Also, be aware that even if you cook regular rice so that it becomes mushier or stickier, it still may not be sticky enough for nigiri-style sushi.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 1 Version 6.jpg
  2. Consider some substitutes. Are you looking to make sticky rice out of regular rice because you cannot find it in a store? If you can't find sticky rice anywhere, try searching for "sweet rice," or "glutinous rice." They are the same thing.[3]
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 2 Version 6.jpg
    • Try using another short-grain rice or risotto rice. Both will have a stickier texture once cooked (compared to medium and long-grained rice).[4] Short-grain rice is stickier than other types of rice once cooked because it has more starch in it.[5]

[Edit]Making Regular Rice Stickier

  1. Do not rinse the rice before you cook it. Most people rinse rice for sanitary purposes, and to get rid of the starch dust. Starch is what causes rice to become sticky and clump together. If you cannot bear to eat rice without washing it, then rinse it once or twice—but don't rinse so much that the water runs clear. You still want some of that starch left.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 3 Version 6.jpg
  2. Consider letting the rice soak in a pot of water before you cook it. Some people find that letting the rice soak in water helps it become stickier in the end. Try soaking it for 30 minutes to 4 hours. Drain the water once the rice has finished soaking.

  3. Fill a large pot with 2 cups (450 milliliters) of water and add a few extra tablespoons of water. Using more water than you actually need will help make the ricer stickier and clumpier.[6]

    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 5 Version 6.jpg
    • Consider adding a dash of salt. This will give the rice some flavor and make it taste less bland.
  4. Add 1 ½ cups (300 grams) of short-grain rice or 1 cup (200 grams) of medium or long-grain rice. Try to use the short-grain rice variety, if you can. Short-grain rice tends to have a higher starch content than medium or long-grain rice, which makes it slightly more sticky.

    • Both jasmine and basmati are considered to be medium-grain.
  5. Bring the water to a boil over high heat. Do not cover the pot with a lid.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 7 Version 5.jpg
  6. Reduce the heat once the water is boiling, and let the rice simmer for 10 minutes. At this point, you can place the lid on the pot.

  7. Turn the heat off once the rice has absorbed all of the water. You may notice some steam holes in the rice.[7]

  8. Leave the pot, covered, on the stove for 10 more minutes.[8] Rice gets stickier the longer you let it sit. If you make it a day or two ahead of time, your rice will be extra sticky. If you do plan on waiting that long, however, you might want to cover the rice and leave it in the fridge so that it doesn't dry out or spoil.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 10 Version 5.jpg
  9. Serve the rice. Transfer the rice to a serving plate. If you want, you can fluff it a little bit with a fork to make it less clumpy.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 11 Version 5.jpg


[Edit]Making Sushi Sticky Rice

  1. Know what to expect. You may be able to get regular rice to taste similar to sushi rice with the help of the right seasoning. However, it is very difficult to get regular rice to have the same sticky consistency as sushi rice. You may be able to use the rice from this method in sashimi, bento, and sushi rolls, but you may find it too difficult to mold for nigiri.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 12 Version 5.jpg
  2. Bring 2 cups (450 milliliters) of water to a boil in a large pot.

  3. Add 1 ½ cups (300 grams) of short-grain rice or 1 cup (200 grams) of medium-grain rice. Try to use the short-grain rice variety, if you can. Short-grain rice tends to have a higher starch content than medium or long-grain rice, which makes it slightly more sticky.

    • Both jasmine and basmati are considered to be medium-grain.
  4. Cover the pot with a lid and simmer for 15 minutes. The water will likely stop boiling for a few seconds when you add the rice. Wait for the water and rice start to boil again, then reduce the heat and cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid. Continue cooking the rice until all of the water is absorbed.

    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 15 Version 5.jpg
  5. Combine 4 tablespoons of rice vinegar, 2 tablespoons of sugar, and 1 teaspoon of salt in a small saucepan. Mix everything together with a spoon. This will be the seasoning for your sushi rice. It may also help your rice become a little more sticky.

  6. Bring the sushi rice seasoning to a boil over medium heat. Stir the seasoning with a fork or a small whisk until the sugar is dissolved.

  7. Remove the seasoning from the stove. Set it aside and let it cool.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 18 Version 4.jpg
  8. Transfer the rice to a glass bowl. During the next few steps, you want to avoid using anything made out of metal, or you will risk the vinegar picking up a metallic taste.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 19 Version 5.jpg
  9. Pour the seasoning over the rice. Do this while the rice is still hot. You don't have to use all of the seasoning if you want a less-intense flavor.

  10. Mix the rice and the seasoning together with a paddle. You can also use a spatula, but make sure that it is not made out of metal.

    • Consider working in front of a fan, or having someone wave a paper fan over the bowl. This will help the rice cool down faster.
  11. Serve the rice while it is still warm. Japanese sticky rice is best while it is still warm, but not hot.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 22 Version 5.jpg

[Edit]Making Mango Sticky Rice

  1. Fill a large pot with 2 cups (450 milliliters) of water and bring it to a boil.

    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 23 Version 5.jpg
  2. Add 1 ½ cups (300 grams) of short-grain rice or 1 cup (200 grams) of medium-grain rice. For best results, try to use a short-grain rice type.[9] Short-grain rice tends to be starchier than medium or long-grain rice by nature, so it might give your better results.

    • Popular medium-grain rice varieties include jasmine and basmati.
  3. Cover the pot with a and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low. Be sure to keep an eye on your pot so that it doesn't boil over.

  4. In another pot, combine 1 ½ cups (337.50 milliliters) of coconut milk, 1 cup (225 grams) of white sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Stir everything together with a spoon to combine. You will be using this to season your rice.

    • To save time, consider doing this while the rice is cooking.
  5. Bring the coconut milk mixture to a boil over medium heat. Be sure to stir the mixture from time to time. This will prevent it from getting scorched.

  6. Stir the coconut milk mixture into the rice once the rice is done cooking. When the rice has finished cooking, take the rice pot off the stove and remove the cover. Pour the coconut milk mixture into the rice, and stir it using a fork or spatula.

  7. Set the seasoned rice aside for one hour. Put the cover back on the rice pot, and place the pot some place where it won't be disturbed. This will give the rice enough time to soak up the flavors from the coconut milk mixture.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 29 Version 5.jpg
  8. Combine ½ cup (112.50 milliliters) of coconut milk, 1 tablespoon of sugar, ¼ teaspoon of salt, and 1 tablespoon of tapioca starch in a saucepan. Stir everything together with a spoon. This will be your sauce. If you don't have any tapioca starch, you can also use cornstarch or arrowroot powder instead.[10]

  9. Bring the sauce to a boil. Be sure to stir the sauce from time to time so that it doesn't curdle or scorch.

  10. Prepare the mango. Start by peeling the mango. If your mango is ripe enough, you should be able to nick the skin with your knife, then pull the skin off. Once you have the mango peeled, cut it in half and remove the seed. Cut the mango into thin slices. Repeat this step for the other two mangoes.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 32 Version 4.jpg
  11. Scoop the rice onto four plates. You can create more servings than just four, but the portions will be smaller.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 33 Version 4.jpg
  12. Arrange the mango slices. You can set them down right next to the rice, or on top of the rice. If you are placing the slices on top of the rice, to overlap them to create a fan-like shape.
    Make Sticky Rice Using Regular Rice Step 34 Version 4.jpg
  13. Drizzle the sauce over the mangoes and rice. If you want, you can also sprinkle some sesame seeds on top of the sauce.

    • Keep in mind that, because you are not using sticky rice, the texture may not be quite the same as in the traditional dish.

[Edit]Video

[Edit]Tips

  • Short grain rice is not the same as sticky rice; however, it does have a higher starch content than regular rice. This means that, compared to other types of rice (such as medium grain or long grain), short grain rice tends to be stickier once cooked.
  • Consider soaking the rice in water for 30 minutes to 4 hours. This will help the rice cook faster.
  • Sticky rice and sushi rice are two different things. Sticky rice comes from Thailand and is commonly used in dessert dishes. Sushi rice is used to make sushi rolls. Because both types of rice have a sticky texture in the end, this article will cover how to make both types.
  • If you really want to use sticky rice in your recipe, but can't find it anywhere, try searching for it in an Asian market. Not all grocery stores carry sticky rice.
  • A trick that many cooks use to measure water levels is to place their finger just above the rice level. The water level is correct if it stops just under the first knuckle.
  • Sticky rice may also be labeled as "sweet rice," or "glutinous rice."[11]

[Edit]Warnings

  • Be aware that there is no real substitute for sticky rice or sushi rice. It is possible to cook regular rice so that it becomes stickier or mushier, but it will lack the particular flavor and texture that sticky rice is known for.


[Edit]Related wikiHows

[Edit]References

The Kitchn, How to Cook Rice on the Stove


[Edit]Quick Summary

How to Say "I Love You" in American Sign Language

Posted: 13 Feb 2020 12:00 AM PST

In Amsterdam they may say "Ik hou van je." In Paris, they most certainly say "Je t'aime." In Albania, they'll say "Te dua," and in Zulu, "Ngiyakuthanda!" It's the phrase we know as "I love you," and this is how you can say it in American Sign Language (ASL).

[Edit]Steps

[Edit]Signing "I Love You"

  1. Point to yourself.[1]

  2. Make a gentle fist with both hands, and cross them over your heart as if you're hugging somebody close.

  3. Point to your loved one.

  4. Put the steps together all at once, and say, "I love you!"[2]

[Edit]Signing "I Love You" Alternatively

  1. Make a fist. Don't make it too tight, and smile when you do it—you're about to tell somebody something wonderful.

  2. Lift up your pinky finger. This creates the sign language symbol for the personal pronoun "I."[3]

  3. Lift up your index finger. This would resemble horns with the two fingers. Unless you're ready to rock, move quickly to the next step![4]

  4. Lift up your thumb. The index finger and thumb create the letter "L," and the pinky finger in concert with the thumb creates the "Y."[5]

  5. Put the steps together all at once, and say, "I love you!"[6]

[Edit]Video

[Edit]Tips

  • Perform this act to someone you love.
  • Hold your palm facing away from you when you do this.
  • Make sure you have the thumb out. If not, this means (to some people) "rock on!

[Edit]Related wikiHows


[Edit]Quick Summary

[Edit]References

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