Translate

Post Your Self

Hello Dearest Gameforumer.com readers

Its your chance to get your news, articles, reviews on board, just use the link: PYS

Thanks and Regards

Thursday, February 27, 2020

economic news of india - world economic news - economics news for students - indian economy news

economic news of india - world economic news - economics news for students - indian economy news


Live: Sensex crashes, over 1,100 points gone amid global selloff

Posted:

And you thought Voda Idea had a Plan B!

Posted:

MUMBAI: Telecom department officials have asked India's two mobile number portability (MNP) service providers on how many porting requests can they process in a day, as the government evaluates contingency options in the eventuality that Vodafone Idea doesn't survive the adjusted gross revenue (AGR) crisis.Officials in the Department of Telecommunications (DoT) though say that the Plan A for the government is to make every effort to see that Vodafone Idea survives the present turmoil, and that India remains a three-private sector player market. On Friday, the Digital Communications Commission (DCC) – the highest decision-making body of the DoT – may discuss some steps on providing relief to stressed telcos such as Vodafone Idea.According to people aware of the developments, the government was informed that at the most 500,000 customers can be ported out each day on a combined basis by the two MNP providers—Syniverse Technologies India and MNP Interconnection Telecom Solutions India. Both companies did not respond to ET's queries at the time of going to press.This capacity though may prove grossly inadequate to cater to over 300 million subscribers of Vodafone Idea, leading to severe service quality issues, as the potential recipients—Bharti Airtel and Reliance Jio—don't have adequate capacity to immediately absorb the massive influx to their networks, say experts. 74362580 A contingency plan in this case is a complex one since it will include how to ensure smooth port outs in bulks of thousands to the two remaining operators. "This will put tremendous strain on the systems. To handle bulk requests of so many million customers will be a big task and hence, a contingency plan needs to be in place," said a person aware of the development. "Also, the telcos will have to discuss what are the charges acceptable to them to take in so many customers".MNP refers to the facility allowing a user to switch telco operators without changing the mobile number. The recipient operator pays a fee to the MNP service provider for processing the request."This will be a panic like situation… right now telcos are operating at 70-80% of network utilization. Without additional spectrum, despite all the spectrum farming (reusing 3G spectrum for 4G), splitting one-third subscriber market between two operators will be very difficult," said SBICap Securities research head Rajiv Sharma.There have been reports that both rivals have started discussing on how to upgrade their network in case Vodafone Idea goes down. Jio has 370 million while Bharti Airtel has 283 million subscribers.Vodafone Idea has so far paid Rs 3,500 crore of the DoT's estimated Rs 57,000 crore dues. The telco estimates its dues to be around Rs 23,000 crore. Experts say the cash-strapped carrier will find it difficult to pay even its own estimated dues in a short period of time.The telco has said it will be forced to shut down unless it gets some relief on its AGR dues. The government is considering, among others, setting up a stress fund for stressed telcos to draw from to pay off AGR dues and repay on easy terms, besides deferment of license fees and spectrum usage charge (SUC) for a substantial period to free up cash flows.On Wednesday, Vodafone Idea dispatched a letter to finance minister, DoT and Niti Ayog, calling on the government to allow it to pay AGR dues over 15 years, after a three-year moratorium. The telecom company has also asked for a tax refund to be adjusted against its dues, cuts in licence fees and SUC and the establishment of a floor for tariffs, among measures to help remain viable.The telco has also urged the DoT not to encash its bank guarantees against unpaid AGR dues, as that would force the telco to close down.Having already rejected a petition seeking review of its October 2019 order, which said AGR should include non-core items, the Supreme Court's hearing of the modification on March 17, which is also the deadline for payment of dues, assumes critical importance.The telcos have asked in the modification pleas to be allowed to negotiate modalities and timelines for paying the AGR dues with the DoT.

Your PF may get you low returns this year

Posted:

New Delhi: Salaried employees could face a cut in interest on their provident fund (PF) deposits this year with lower yields seen on investments by the Employees' Provident Fund Organisation (EPFO).The EPFO is considering a cut of 15 basis points in the interest rate on PF deposits in FY20 to 8.5%. Provident fund deposits had fetched 8.65% in FY19. The issue is likely to be taken up at the central board of trustees (CBT) meeting of the EPFO on March 5.The retirement fund body may find it difficult to keep the interest rate unchanged for this fiscal, a person aware of the financials told ET. The earnings on longterm fixed deposits, bonds and government securities are down 50-80 basis points over the past one year, said the person. One basis point is one-hundredth of a percentage point.The Finance Investment & Audit Committee (FIAC) will take a final call just before the CBT meet on the rate of return on PF deposits, depending on the exact earnings of the retirement fund body. 74366135 Rs 4,500 crore Exposure in DHFLThe decision will be presented to the CBT at the meeting and it will then take a call on the matter. The EPFO has investments of more than Rs 18 lakh crore, of which about Rs 4,500 crore was in Dewan Housing Finance Corp. Ltd (DHFL) and Infrastructure Leasing & Financial Services (IL&FS), both of which have been laid low by their inability to make payments. The first is undergoing bankruptcy resolution after RBI direction and the second is going through a governmentsupervised rescue programme.The EPFO invests 85% of its annual accruals in the debt market and 15% in equities through exchange traded funds (ETFs). At the end of March last year, the EPFO had a cumulative investment of Rs 74,324 crore in equities, fetching a return of 14.74%.However, the government doesn't want to fuel disgruntlement among workers, who won't be happy about lower PF rates."Interest rate on EPFO is a big sentiment booster and any cut on it at this point may further hit the employee sentiment," said one of the persons cited above.The CBT headed by the labour minister is the apex decision-making body of the EPFO that has an active subscriber base of 600,000.Some of the other issues that will be taken up for consideration include engaging TCS iON for conducting computer data entry skill tests and cumulative performance evaluation of portfolio managers for the period ended September 30, 2019.

Coronavirus: What makes India a ticking time bomb

Posted:

By Ari AltstedterAs the novel coronavirus spreads from China around the globe, India appears especially at risk because of its dense population, patchy health-care system and high rate of migration.The nation has confirmed just three cases, while the Indian government says 23,531 people are under observation. Neighbouring Sri Lanka has reported one infection, while Pakistan disclosed its first patients this week: Two travelers who had separately returned from Iran, one of whom had been on a tour with 28 people.While India's numbers look tiny set against a population of 1.3 billion, the World Health Organization has warned that new cases are appearing faster outside China than those within the country where the virus originated. The discovery in the U.S. of a case with no ties to a known outbreak has raised concern that a similar emergence in a country as densely populated as India could quickly overwhelm the chronically underfunded health-care system."It's already here, they've detected a few cases, and if it starts spreading you will see a very fast" evolution, said Kasisomayajula Viswanath, a professor at Harvard's T.H. Chan School of Public Health. "Right now they are able to control it, and monitor it, and treat it effectively. But if it is spreading along with other contagious diseases that are already here, then it becomes a matter of considerable concern."Apart from its sheer size, India is cause for particular worry because of the density of its population: 420 people live on each square kilometer (about 0.4 of a square mile), compared with 148 per square kilometer in China. Places like Mumbai's Dharavi slum, or even a typical Indian household containing extended families, can facilitate contact with virus-bearing droplets emitted by breathing, talking, coughing or sneezing.Pakistan and Bangladesh look even more exposed than their larger South Asian neighbor. The two spend less on health care than India, and each has an array of entry points from countries where outbreaks are increasing.Pakistan's first case appears to have come from neighbouring Iran, which has emerged as the center of the outbreak in the Middle East, with at least 245 confirmed cases and 26 deaths. Pakistan has suspended all flights to China, Japan, and now Iran. Like Bangladesh, Pakistan has declined to evacuate students stranded in China. Bangladesh did extract 312 citizens from Wuhan, the origin of the virus, keeping them in quarantine in camps outside Dhaka for 14 days.Rural WorkersLike China, India has a high rate of internal migration. In the 2011 census, 450 million people moved from one area to another in search of opportunity. Many commute daily from their villages to work in the cities. That could make it harder to contain an outbreak to one locality, as China has attempted to do by locking down the entire state of Hubei."That's not really possible in India," said Vivekanand Jha, the executive director of the George Institute for Global Health, India, in New Delhi. "Indians, if they are infected, are much more likely to remain in circulation and potentially come in contact with uninfected individuals wherever in the world they might be."A large-scale outbreak stands to put a heavy strain on India's economy, which is much smaller than China's and where growth this year is on track to be the weakest in more than a decade.The country's health-care spending is among the lowest in the world — just 3.7% of gross domestic product. That's left India with a patchwork of overcrowded public hospitals, and private ones that are unaffordable for many people.Travelers ScreenedIndian Health Minister Harsh Vardhan said he's "extremely proud" of his country's response so far to containing the virus, which includes input from the armed forces, national carrier Air India and embassies abroad. Authorities have been screening travelers at airports, seaports and border crossings. It says the three confirmed cases, all discovered in the southern state of Kerala, have all been discharged from hospital.Still, Padmanesan Narasimhan, a professor of public health at the University of New South Wales who has worked on tuberculosis control in India, said the chances of the disease spreading in India are high."Because of internal migration, and the population density, and the limited access to health infrastructure, that would be a major challenge in India," he said.Disease ExpertiseOne area where India and its South Asian neighbors may have an advantage over the places where the coronavirus is already spreading is the weather. Coronaviruses of all kinds tend to travel better in cooler, drier climates — it's why flu season is in winter — and with the subcontinent's summer approaching, the stifling heat may end up snuffing out the virus, too.Moreover, while health-care systems across the region are underfunded, they do have expertise in fighting infectious diseases, given the prevalence of malaria, dengue and tuberculosis. Wealthier economies, from Hong Kong to Italy to Japan, have struggled to quell the spread of the virus."If it comes here, certainly it is a matter for concern because of the density of the population, and the sheer scale of it," said Harvard's Viswanath. "On the other hand, it looks like we've not been able to do a good job globally. I don't have tremendous confidence in other systems, either."— With assistance from Faseeh Mangi, Kamran Haider, Bibhudatta Pradhan, Asantha Sirimanne and Arun Devnath.

Tatas may snap power lines to 5 states

Posted:

Mumbai: Tata Power, which runs one of the country's largest power plants at Mundra in Gujarat, has threatened to stop supply from the plant to five states beginning March if they don't agree to tariff increases. The Mumbai-based company, which may incur a loss of Rs 1,000 crore from this one unit alone this year, has issued notices over the past few weeks to distribution companies owned by the state governments of Gujarat, Haryana, Rajasthan, Punjab and Maharashtra on the possible disruption.People close to the development said that Tata Power has made it clear that it will not be able to run the power plant unless the pass-through of additional fuel cost to consumers is allowed."We have written to them (discoms) that we may have to consider shutting down if there is no positive response, we have not said we will shut down," a Tata Power spokesperson told ET.Pressure to Honour Apex Court Ruling"Our attempt has been to arrive at a mutually acceptable arrangement. We have waited long for a resolution and losses are mounting. We do hope that states will take steps to finalise this quickly." 74367140 The development piles up the pressure on state governments to take action nearly one-and-a-half years after the Supreme Court asked the central power regulator to consider increasing tariffs for fuel cost increase in the case of three power companies.The Central Electricity Regulatory Commission (CERC) allowed the increase in April last year but the states have been dragging their feet.Stoppage of power from Mundra will force the states to buy expensive electricity from outside, Tata Power said. The development also highlights the chaotic state of India's power sector with loss-making discoms struggling to pay dues even as muchneeded mega investment in the power sector languishes. Shares of Tata Power closed at Rs 49.35 on the BSE Thursday, almost unchanged from the previous close.Gujarat is the only state to have approved a revised power purchase agreement allowing for an increase. State elections in Maharashtra derailed talks and caused delays. People in the know said that the Punjab government has agreed to part of the revision but it has not yet approved the tariff while Haryana is still against tariff hike."We have responded to Tata Power's notice by asking them not to take any extreme step. The Gujarat government has already passed the resolution but others are yet to agree. It is a joint contract which we cannot sign unless others give consent," a senior executive from Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam, the state discom, told ET.Tata Power is expected to incur losses of Rs 1,000 crore from the Mundra unit in 2019-20.It is significantly lower than the Rs 1,700 crore loss incurred last year as coal prices have declined. "The discoms are dragging their feet. Even with the tariff revision, the power supplied from Mundra will still be cheaper by at least Rs 1/ unit compared to any other source they may buy from, which would translate into Rs 2,500-3,000 crore annually," a senior Tata Power executive said. India had launched an ambitious plan to set up ultra mega power projects of 4,000 mw each to meet the country's growing power demand more than a decade ago.Only two projects could be commissioned, the first one being the imported coal-fuelled Mundra unit, which was bagged by the Tatas at a levelised tariff of Rs 2.26 for a unit. But a change in policy in Indonesia in 2011made coal import expensive. Tariff hikes were denied till the Supreme Court gave some relief in 2018.

India’s digital payments to grow substantially than in past decade: Ajay Banga, CEO, Mastercard

Posted:

India will likely be among the global leaders in the adoption of digital payments, said Ajay Banga, CEO, Mastercard. In an interview with Ashwin Manikandan and Saloni Shukla, the executive, who would assume the role of chairman after a CEO mandate for a decade, said that out of the total 65 million merchants in India, only 5-6 million accept digital payments. Therefore, the scope for expansion is huge. Edited excerpts:You have been at the helm of Mastercard for 10 years. Why the transition now? Was it on the cards for a long time?I have always said I will give this 10 years if the board wants me there and I have had a great run. Life is 50% luck — I have said that often. I have been lucky to be here. The other 50% is what you do with your luck. As a company, we have seized our opportunities. We have had a 13% cumulative average growth rate on revenues, our stock is up 16 times in these 10 years, and we are among the top few companies in the world in terms of market capitalisation. The thing a leader does very well is to develop a good bunch of people; we have had several very good people in the company. And I am convinced that Michael (Miebach) can take the benchmark to a whole new plane. It's a properly planned succession — something you don't see enough of these days.You have been vocal about government and regulatory policies. NPCI has government support in the Indian payment landscape. Does that give you a level playing field?Companies like ours bring in global technology, scale and capability and therefore the value of that to a market like India. I have often said that we operate in countries at the pleasure and desire of the local government. At the end of the day, just because I bring in good technology and skill doesn't mean India needs to always roll out the welcome mat. We are trying to enable a digitisation agenda in every country.From a regulatory perspective, what need to be done to push digital payments growth?I think the regulator has been very fair and transparent; I don't have a lot of advice for them. The RBI is one of the best regulators in the world. We have been telling them our views on data predictability, and we are also talking to them to enable payment directly from your bank account using our facility called 'pay-by-account.' RBI is very constructive.India conducted a demonetisation drive in 2016, but the cash usage in the economy is still substantially high. Do you see digital use picking up?For reduced cash in an economy at a personal consumption level, many things have to fall in place. You need the fintech part, the ability to provide the consumers an easy way to connect with their money. My general view is that there is much more required, like the acceptance infrastructure across the merchant ecosystem. We are working closely with the Confederation of All India Traders, which has 65 million merchants, to help increase acceptance. The government is actively working on expanding digital payments in trains and buses.Won't tell you the answer for the percentage reduction of cash as against digital payments. I have not seen that happen over a decade in any country in the world. You can look at countries where cash is a very small percentage of personal consumption. Countries like the US still have 40-50% transactions in cash. Don't know the right number for India but do expect digital payments in India to grow substantially than in the past 10 years. About 5-6 million merchants accept card payments in India which is way more than what it used to be four years ago when just 1 million merchants accepted cards. But, the scope is huge as there are nearly 65 million merchants in India.74364928 The government decided to remove the merchant discount fee on RuPay and UPI transactions. Will that help spur payments growth?Wherever in the world MDR has been reduced to the levels where it makes it uneconomical for the acquirer or issuer to participate in the natural business of electronic payments, you tend to lose the momentum. It's a balancing act.Different countries do it differently. We need to find a way to ensure economic sustenance for this model. My general view is that commercial sustainability in these decisions is very important; there are a lot of studies done around the world to show that this is the right way to think about it.Small ticket payments around the world have a revenue model. Now, if you squeeze these revenue models, obviously then how would you get the investments? That's why there needs to be a balance. There is no evidence that reducing MDR takes the growth in the acceptance to the next level.Your name has often been floated as a possible candidate to succeed Aditya Puri at HDFC Bank. Have you been approached for the role?No, and this is factually incorrect. I have never been approached. Why at the end of 10 years after taking my company to a $300 billion market cap would I want to at this stage of life give up my opportunity and go to a different company? I love HDFC Bank and I love Puri. Aditya is one of my best friends and Deepak (Parekh) is an outstanding individual as well. Why the heck would I go back? I have never been approached and even if I were approached, while it may be flattering, but I have zero desire to go for another role in India.You have cut your revenue forecast. Is this largely because of the Covid-19 outbreak?In the first quarter of this year, our revenue will be 200-300 basis points lower than what we had originally expected. We haven't made further projections because we honestly don't know what will be the impact of coronavirus on a go-forward basis. I think the situation is still fluid and unfolding. As you can see newer cases in China are fewer, but it looks like there have been newer cases in certain other countries. The impact on our business is the effect this has on crossborder travel and commerce. Big conferences or travels are either being reduced or cancelled.You dropped out of the Libra project. But what are your views on cryptocurrency in replacing fiat currency?I think blockchain is an important technology. We as a company are one of the largest patent holders on blockchain. We are yet to figure out the ways to enable it in its full potential. Bitcoin or cryptocurrency is one of the uses of the blockchain. My problem traditionally is that the predictive value is neither stable nor transparent. With India being serious with its anti-money laundering stance, there is a concern about who is paying whom as there is a lack of transparency.My general view is that I don't know yet the use of blockchain in the currency environment. We have participated with different players including Libra, where we dropped out just now, but any such model must fit in with the policy view of the countries concerned.

Sebi tells mutual funds to make liquidity buffer for debt schemes

Posted:

The Securities and Exchange Board of India (Sebi) exhorted the mutual fund industry to build an adequate 'liquidity buffer' for debt schemes to be better prepared for any event of a crisis in future. The capital markets regulator has also asked mutual funds to participate more in the voting process of company resolutions rather than abstain from them.Sebi said the ongoing credit crisis that resulted in returns of various debt mutual fund schemes taking sharp hits has brought to surface the kind of liquidity pressures that the industry could face."There was a debate if the mutual fund industry should be at par with banks having an SLR (statutory liquidity ratio) and CRR (cash reserve ratio). Should mutual fund industry have an SLR at all?" Sebi whole time member G Mahalingam said at the CII Mutual Fund Summit on Thursday.Last year in September, the regulator brought in compulsory liquidity buffer in overnight and liquid funds, where in funds were mandated to invest 20 per cent in liquid assets. 74366350 "Now, this is a nudge which is coming from the regulator. But, what I would wish is that the industry itself is going to operate on a cycle where it actually is able to gauge what is going to be the liquidity demands in a stress scenario, and it is able to build up the liquidity buffer by building up a ladder of liquidity maturities," Mahalingam said. He said it would squeeze the industry and over a period of time, mutual funds would be volume-based and not margin-based.Analysts said any SLR requirement could impact returns on debt mutual fund schemes."SLR will help create liquidity and is a good idea, but one must keep in mind that it could lead to lower yields," says Kaustubh Belapurkar, director, research, Morningstar India.Mahalingam also warned mutual funds against mis-selling of credit risk funds — which invest more than 65 per cent of their corpus in lower-rated bonds — to investors by assuring them unrealistic returns."We've gone through stressful times. Clearly, the industry needs to ask a question to itself, how do I sell the credit funds? How do I market it to consumers? Do you market it saying it will fetch you 50 bps (basis points) extra, or do you also tell him that there is a risk which is inherent and hidden there?" said Mahalingam."I think it is the bounded duty of the industry and the distributors to bring clearly this risk into perspective so that the retail investor does take a calculated call. We don't want to deal with complaints later — that I was told that I will get a return of 10-11 per cent."The Sebi official said MFs will have to do a more responsible sales job while selling credit risk funds because of the risks involved. He said investors are going to crowd the industry in search of alpha as the interest rate trend downwards. Alpha refers to the extent of outperformance of a product over its benchmark. "Alpha is going to become a demanding factor. But then from regulators perspective I would like to say, this cannot be the sole obsessive factor for the industry. I think the Greek language has other alphabets too such as beta and gamma and I think we need to focus on things other than alpha," Mahalingam said.The Sebi official also said mutual funds must keep away from structured obligations which don't make things clear.The regulator said mutual fund industry should play a leading role in corporate governance with regard to voting in corporate resolutions."Whether it's Crompton Greaves, Religare or Fortis, I think these are shocks for the industry and gone are the days when we can tell that these are few in number, so we can afford to neglect them. Mutual funds will have to play a constructive role. I took note of the fact that there are 12 per cent abstentions by the mutual fund industry. This should be reduced to a single-digit over a period of next three to four years. It should come close to one to two percent. Others like insurance and pension fund industry should take a leaf out of the mutual fund industry and play a constructive role in corporate governance," Mahalingam said.

F&O rollover hints volatility to continue, Nifty hits 4-month low

Posted:

Traders carried forward bearish bets to the March derivatives series as the stock market could remain on shaky ground because of continued worries over Covid-19 outbreak turning into a world-wide pandemic. With benchmark indices hitting four-month lows on Thursday, expiry day of the February series, analysts expect a bounceback, but fear any renewed strength could be short-lived.Nifty rollovers on expiry day stood at 69 per cent on provisional basis, higher than the February series figure of 66 per cent, said analysts. "Short positions created by FIIs during the series have been rolled over to the next month and fresh short positions have been added in the new series," said Amit Gupta, head of derivatives at ICICIdirect.Indices extended losses to the fifth straight day on Thursday with the Nifty index ending down 45 points, or 0.4 per cent, from the previous close at 11,633.30. The Sensex slid 143 points, or 0.4 per cent to 39,745.66. However, they ended off their session lows of 1 per cent. 74365874 "There are more chances of downside than upside. Any bounce-back to 11,700-11,800 is likely to be sold off and we are cautious on the market for the next series," said Yogesh Radke, head of alternative and quantitative research at Edelweiss.Foreign investors offloaded Indian stocks worth Rs 3,127 crore on Thursday, taking their total sales tally to almost Rs 10,000 crore in the past four days. Domestic institutional investors continued their shopping spree, buying stocks worth nearly Rs 3,500 crore on Thursday.The volatility index — India VIX — which measures market's perception of risk in near-term, surged 26 per cent during the expiry week."The India VIX moved up by 5.7 per cent in the February series and went up sharply in the expiry week, which could continue," said Chandan Taparia, derivatives analyst at Motilal Oswal.The spread of Covid-19 outside China has raised concerns about its impact on global growth, leading to foreign investors dumping riskier assets like emerging market equities.Even though the Nifty fell below 11,550 on Thursday, put writers were holding positions which indicates that there is possibility of a bounce-back to 11,750, but it will remain a 'sell on rise' market, said analysts.The 11,800 strike holds the highest open interest among Nifty put options, followed by the 11,700 strike. The 12,000 strike holds the highest number of open positions among Nifty call options expiring March 26.Analysts say Nifty March futures being at a discount to the spot price, despite factoring in dividends by companies during the month, also indicates bearishness in the market. Nifty March futures closed at 11,618.8 on a provisional basis, at a 14.5 per cent discount to the spot index. "If it fails to surpass 11,777, then it may continue its weakness towards 11,533 then 11,430-11,333 zones," added Taparia.

63,000-plus robots at Accenture’s operations

Posted:

BENGALURU: Accenture's operations division has the largest robot workforce in the industry, topping 63,000, the incoming head of the unit told ET.The company, however, does not forecast robots replacing humans. Manish Sharma takes charge of the $6 billion unit with over 141,000 employees on March 1, as part of Accenture's recent re-organization. "I don't want my people anywhere in the world to do boring jobs. We call it MRPT — measurable, repeatable, predictable and transaction work — that our people will not do," Sharma told ET in an interview. "That will be done by robots and our people will be the supervisors of robots."Sharma said automation should be a goal in itself as companies look to make processes more efficient."If you have wasteful processes, and you automate them, that does not help. We don't automate processes if it doesn't meet certain criteria. You have to design the process and get to the core of the issue," Sharma said.Accenture's Synops platform allows it to map a process, closely follow how a single agent performs a task, and then create a potential framework to automate parts of it.This then allows the agent to focus on problems that the automated system had been unable to resolve. Sharma, who completes 25 years at Accenture this March, said he wants to ensure that Accenture continues to be a market leader in the industry. "The big shift that we are looking at is trying to drive massive innovation at a huge scale for our clients. The industry earlier was built around how many full-time equivalents (billable employees) you had. And, we are now saying we are partners with our clients to deliver business outcomes," Sharma said.In moving to an outcome-based model, companies link their fees to the results they can produce for clients, either in the form of cost-savings or faster processing with fewer issues.BPO companies are increasingly moving towards outcome-based models.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Gameforumer QR Scan

Gameforumer QR Scan
Gameforumer QR Scan