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Saturday, January 4, 2020

Business News, Updates

Business News, Updates


40 Big Tech Predictions for 2019

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:32 AM PST

Digital transformation has arrived. 40 Big Tech Predictions for 2019

Not a single industry is safe from the unstoppable wave of digitization that is sweeping through finance, retail, transportation, and more.

And in 2019, there will be even more transformative developments that will  our businesses, careers, and lives.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Alex Rodriguez took phone pictures of Jennifer Lopez on the red carpet, proving he's the ultimate Instagram fiancé

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:25 AM PST

jennifer lopez jlo arod alex rodriguez couple red carpetFrazer Harrison/Getty Images for Palm Springs International Film Festival

Alex Rodriguez supported his fiancé Jennifer Lopez by taking pictures of her as she walked the red carpet at the Palm Springs International Film Festival Awards Gala in Palm Springs, California, on Thursday.

The former athlete was photographed standing off to the side of the event's step-and-repeat backdrop, holding his phone to photograph Lopez. 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: Are you superstitious on days like Friday the 13th? These are the origins of 7 common superstitions, like why we knock on wood.

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Trump is not a fan of civil liberties, and Americans are more willing to give up their rights when they're scared. Here's why there's reason to be concerned, regardless of what happens with Iran

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:12 AM PST

US President Donald Trump hugging flagJoe Raedle/Getty Images

  • Throughout US history in times of crisis, infringements on civil liberties by the government are not just to be expected — they're also distressingly popular with the public. 
  • In the almost two decades since 9/11, the Bush and Obama administrations both massively expanded law enforcement powers that come with little accountability, with the support of both parties. 
  • Now President Donald Trump has those powers, and he has a demonstrated history of hostility to civil liberties even in peacetime.
  • Fears of a terror attack, cyberattack, or a war with Iran are on people's minds following the drone strike assassination of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani on Thursday.
  • The combination of the US's history of surrendering civil liberties in the name of safety, expansive government surveillance authority, and Trump in the White House is cause for Americans to be vigilant in maintaining their own rights — no matter what happens next with Iran.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Throughout US history in times of crisis, infringements on civil liberties by the government are not just to be expected — they're also distressingly popular with the public. 

In the almost two decades since 9/11, the Bush and Obama administrations massively expanded law enforcement powers that come with little accountability, thanks to the support of lawmakers in both parties. Now President Donald Trump has those powers, and he has a demonstrated history of hostility to civil liberties even in peacetime.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: A law professor weighs in on how Trump could beat impeachment

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SEE ALSO: Trump attacked the evangelical magazine Christianity Today by calling it 'radical left,' and it shows just how meaningless the phrase has become for him

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani says the US made a 'grave mistake' by assassinating top general Qassem Soleimani

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:12 AM PST

rouhani trump wideAP/AP

  • Iranian President Hassan Rouhani said Saturday that the US made a "grave mistake" by assassinating top general Qassem Soleimani.
  • During a visit with Soleimani's family in Tehran, Rouhani said "everyone will take revenge."
  • President Donald Trump ordered the airstrike that killed Soleimani on Friday, as he was leaving the Baghdad airport. He said it was to prevent "imminent and sinister attacks."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The president of Iran on Saturday vowed vengeance a day after his top general, Qassem Soleimani, was killed in a US airstrike in Iraq.

President Hassan Rouhani said that the US made a "grave mistake" and "will face consequences of this criminal act not only today, but also in the coming years," according to CNN.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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The most famous book set in every state

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:11 AM PST

BI Graphics_Most Famous book 4x3Skye Gould/INSIDER

Do you need a new book to read for the New Year? Did you just move to a new state, or are you looking to armchair travel? Business Insider has you covered.

After scouring the internet and surveying our colleagues on their picks, we rounded up the most famous book set in every state in America. Here we've presented them, listed by state, in alphabetical order.

If you want to see every book in an organized chart, scroll to the end to see our map.

Melissa Stanger contributed reporting on a previous version of this post.

ALABAMA: "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

Amazon

When a local attorney is asked to defend an African American man accused of rape, he has to decide between doing what's right and doing what society expects of him, launching his children right in the middle of the conflict.

This Pulitzer Prize winner is set in Maycomb, a community divided by racism and inspired by Lee's hometown of Monroeville. 

Buy the book here »



ALASKA: "Into the Wild" by Jon Krakauer

Amazon

A young man from a family of money donates all of his savings to charity and abandons his possessions before hitchhiking into the Alaskan wilderness to reinvent himself.

This true story survival-drama was made into a movie of the same name in 2007, directed by Sean Penn and starring Emile Hirsch, shedding light on McCandless' idealism of a life unburdened by material possessions and the harsh realities of the Alaskan wild.

Buy the book here »



ARIZONA: "The Bean Trees" by Barbara Kingsolver

Amazon

Taylor is well on her way to escaping small-town life. But shortly into her journey to Tucson, Arizona, where she hopes to start over, a stranger leaves her with a Native American toddler with a traumatic past.

Kingsolver's story of finding salvation in a barren situation is packed with real places and events.

Buy the book here »




See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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SEE ALSO: 22 books that will expand your mind and change your life, according to a productivity expert

NOW READ: Here's the income you need to live comfortably in every state in the US

US cities are ramping up security following the Trump-ordered airstrike that killed a top Iranian commander

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:02 AM PST

Qassem SoleimaniATTA KENARE/AFP via Getty Images

  • Major US cities have announced increased security in response to concerns over threats stemming from the Pentagon's killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a top Iranian military official.
  • Tensions have flared among lawmakers and activists who criticized President Donald Trump's orders for the move, which sparked concerns that tensions in the region could spill over into targeting of US cities and entities.
  • The Department of Homeland said there was no existing credible threat of attack from Iran, but lawmakers in cities like Washington, DC, New York City, and Los Angeles announced that authorities would be closely monitoring possible threats and popular areas.
  • As congressional lawmakers face upcoming deliberation over next steps, more than 70 protests were planned in cities across the US to push back on the possibility of sending more American troops to the Middle East.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Major US cities have announced increased security and surveillance as tensions flare in response to the killing of Gen. Qassem Soleimani, a top Iranian military official, under orders from President Donald Trump.

The targeted killing of Gen. Soleimani, the head of Iran's elite Quds Force of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, sparked concerns over Iranian retaliation against American entities in the Middle East amid existing tensions and a warning from Iranian supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who said that a "harsh retaliation is waiting" for Americans.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: A law professor weighs in on how Trump could beat impeachment

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Trump lit a fire by exiting the Iran Deal and poured gasoline on it by killing Soleimani

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:02 AM PST

A boy carries a portrait of Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in the U.S. airstrike in Iraq, prior to the Friday prayers in Tehran, Iran, Friday Jan. 3, 2020. Iran has vowed Associated Press

  • The US killing of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani is a major loss for Iran, but it also crosses an important line in the Middle East.
  • US leaders and interests are now potential targets, and the fallout out is likely to be very damaging to the US presence in the region, writes Gary Sick.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

The first time I heard the name of Gen. Qassem Soleimani mentioned as a possible president of Iran was during the last days of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's presidency, perhaps about 2012. Later it was fashionable in some circles to speculate about a replacement for the Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.

Soleimani was not a cleric, let alone an ayatollah, but it was possible to imagine that in a time of crisis, when the United States was threatening war and squeezing the Iranian economy unmercifully, that a new leadership, possibly composed of military, civilian, and clerical leaders might be installed in the event of the death or incapacity of Khamenei, who was nearly 80 years old and suffering from prostate cancer.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: Here's how many refugees from banned countries have entered the US under Trump

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SEE ALSO: How Trump's sanctions made the Iranian Revolutionary Guard's economic empire stronger

Our video producers traveled around the world tasting food for the show "Best of the Best." Here's everything they ate.

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:02 AM PST

  • In 2019, Insider traveled to cities around the world tasting some of the best signature dishes the cities have to offer, to find which one really is the best of the best.
  • Now, we're rounding up all 14 episodes from season 2 for your viewing pleasure, from pizza in Naples to ramen in LA.
  • 3 hosts from the season, Herrine Ro, Joe Avella, and Harry Kersh, also weigh in with some behind-the-scenes anecdotes from each episode.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

Best Chocolate Chip Cookie in NYC 00:17

Best Taco in LA 14:58

Best Burger in London 32:27

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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10 times celebrities snubbed their own TV shows

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 09:00 AM PST

gossip girl grey anatomyThe CW/ABC

From actors who clash with their co-stars to celebrities who admit to disliking their own television shows, what you see on the small screen is often only half the story. 

Here are a few of the most memorable times television stars seemingly snubbed or outwardly insulted their own shows.

The Jonas Brothers have all shared their regrets about starring on the Disney sitcom "Jonas."

Jaimie Trueblood/Disney Channel

The Jonas Brothers have all been pretty open about their days of filming Disney's "Jonas" sitcom from 2009 to 2010. 

"We shouldn't have done that," Nick Jonas said in the Amazon Prime documentary  "Chasing Happiness" in 2019. "It really stunted our growth. I feel like it was just a bad move. It was just not the time. Literally, we couldn't evolve because of it."

"It was not on-brand for us as the band that we were becoming and the songs that we were writing," Kevin Jonas also said in the documentary. "It was almost like two very different identities. I think that affected the perception of the band, that we were a joke."'

Joe Jonas has also expressed his regrets about the show, explaining that it felt like he and his brothers were pretending to be young for it. 

"The thing about the show was that some of the writing on it was terrible," Joe Jonas told Vulture in 2013. "It just ended up being some weird slapstick humor that only a 10-year-old would laugh at."



Katherine Heigl once took herself out of the running for an award for "Grey's Anatomy."

ABC

In a move that reportedly angered producers, ABC's "Grey's Anatomy" star Katherine Heigl voluntarily opted out of the 2008 Emmy race after winning the previous year's award for best supporting actress in a drama series. 

"I did not feel that I was given the material this season to warrant an Emmy nomination and in an effort to maintain the integrity of the academy organization, I withdrew my name from contention," Heigl said in a statement that was first given to former Los Angeles Times blog, Gold Derby, according to The New York Times

"In addition, I did not want to potentially take away an opportunity from an actress who was given such materials," Heigl added. She left the medical drama in 2010. 



Chace Crawford once said he'd have to look for his dignity after leaving "Gossip Girl."

The CW

Chace Crawford starred on The CW hit "Gossip Girl" for years, but he's since implied that his role as Nate Archibald took away his dignity. 

In a 2012 interview with Us Weekly, Crawford joked that leaving "Gossip Girl" would mean tracking down his lost dignity.

"I'm gonna look for my dignity," he said. "My dignity is somewhere on set. I think it happened around season two. Leading into season three, it was all out the window."




See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Nail artists are using dish soap to create bubble nail art

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 08:52 AM PST

  • Nail artists are constantly finding inspiring nail hacks, and this bubble nail art technique does not disappoint.
  • Simply layer dish soap suds over a wet topcoat for this cool alligator-skin effect.
  • It can be achieved over gel polish, chrome, and foil.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

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Iranian commander killed in airstrike taunted Trump in a 2018 speech, calling him a 'bartender' and 'casino manager'

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 08:32 AM PST

qassem soleimani 3The Middle East Media Research Institute

  • President Donald Trump ordered an airstrike on Friday which killed Qassem Soleimani, arguably the top military figure in Iran.
  • The airstrike comes less than two years after Soleimani degraded Trump in a speech, calling him a "bartender" and a "casino manager."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

In the wake of the US airstrike that killed Iran's top general, a video has resurfaced of Qassem Soleimani giving a speech in which he likened President Donald Trump to a "bartender or a casino manager."

Soleimani gave the speech in July 2018, in response to Trump accusing Iranian President Hassan Rouhani of making "demented words of violence and death." Trump cautioned Rouhani from threatening the US, saying they would "suffer consequences the likes of which few throughout history have ever suffered before."

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Fans are saying Kim Kardashian West looks just like North in a throwback photo she shared of her with Khloe and Kourtney as kids

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 08:06 AM PST

kim and north west kardashianRich Fury/Forum Photos via Getty Images

Kim Kardashian West is always one to enjoy reminiscing on throwback photos — and in her most recent Instagram post, she shared a rare picture of the Kardashian sisters in their childhood prime.

"Triplets," read Kardashian West's caption describing the photo of her with Kourtney and Khloe, who were all wearing matching floral ensembles.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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12 AI startups that will boom in 2019, according to VCs

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 08:01 AM PST

Venture capitalists are the startup experts, the ones who have their finger on the pulse of which fledgling companies will boom and which will bust.

artificial intelligence robotSean Gallup/Getty Images

As part of Business Insider Prime's comprehensive coverage of the startups that will strike gold in 2019, we asked VCs to name the startups they think are going to be hot this year. They told us about companies they currently have in their portfolios, as well as ones they haven't put any money into yet but are at the center of positive news.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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I decided to take a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Ecuador after a financial planner changed the way I think about spending

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 08:00 AM PST

woman on a suspension bridge in ecuadorLaura BC/Getty Images

The world of personal finance is rife with pithy pieces of advice: "Pay yourself first," "A penny saved is a penny earned," "Buy low, sell high," "You can't take it with you," and so on. 

We hear these phrases so often that they can eventually become meaningless background noise. But a few years ago, I heard a bite-sized piece of financial advice that changed how I make financial decisions from that point onward.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Online lender Earnest offers low-interest personal loans, and looks at more than just your credit score when you apply

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:48 AM PST

couple moving into new houseHero Images/Getty Images

One thing that's certain about adult life is that it's expensive. Paying rent, insurance, food, transportation, technology, and more all add up fast. That's not including the big life stuff, like weddings, funerals, moving, and home improvements. 

Given the cost of managing everything in your life, let's face it, sometimes you just need extra money. You need extra money and maybe you can't wait to save and need it now. So what are you to do? 

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

NOW WATCH: From Cyber Monday deals to Prime-only steals, this is how Amazon gets you to spend more money

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A worker at the Harry Potter studio tour in the UK was sentenced for stealing more than $48,000 worth of merchandise to sell online

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:45 AM PST

harry potter studios londonDan Kitwood/Getty Images

  • An employee at the Harry Potter Studio Tour was sentenced on Friday for stealing $48,000 worth in merchandise and selling it on eBay.
  • Adam Hills stole a total of 1,040 items between December 2017 and March 2018.
  • He was caught after colleagues noticed merchandise appearing and disappearing from under his desk.
  • Visit Insider's homepage for more stories.

An employee at the Harry Potter Studio Tour in the UK has been charged with stealing almost £37,000 ($48,000) in merchandise during their employment there, the Crown Prosecution Service announced on Friday.

The Harry Potter Studio Tour is a tourist destination on the outskirts of London where fans can go and see how the hit movies were made.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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I opened a high-yield savings account with Ally, and loved the high interest and low fees so much I quickly opened another

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:45 AM PST

ally high yield savings winter snow dogJelena Jovanovic / EyeEm / Getty Images

  • Ally Bank offers consistently above-average interest rates on its saving accounts, along with no minimum balance and no recurring fees.
  • You can open more than one savings account at Ally, which is great for planning for goals and long-term savings needs. I opened two: one for my emergency fund, and another for my property taxes.
  • I even told my sister to open one, and she called me the next month, thrilled to see the interest deposited in her account.
  • See Business Insider's picks for the best high-yield savings accounts »

For most of my savings and investments, I'm a big fan of keeping things simple. Fewer accounts means less to monitor, less to worry about, and less to check up on during financial reviews. The one place where I add extra accounts on purpose is savings.

I have a few different savings accounts for different goals, like an emergency fund and saving for property taxes and insurance. I decided the best place for my multiple accounts was Ally, the online bank known for its high-yield savings. Here's why.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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I signed up for $1 million of life insurance before I ever had kids, and I'd tell any 20-something to do the same

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:42 AM PST

how i chose life insuranceLayland Masuda/Getty Images

If you are single without kids, life insurance is probably the farthest thing from your mind. While I briefly looked at life insurance when I was 22, I didn't get serious about it until about a half-decade later, when I bought $1 million in life insurance coverage before I had my children.

That delay likely cost me a little bit every single month for 30 years.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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Iranian commander and Trump fought each other with 'Game of Thrones' memes before airstrike on General Soleimani

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:34 AM PST

trump and soleimani game of thrones memesScreenshot Twitter/@realDonaldTrump, Twitter/@Tasnimnews_EN

  • Before the US airstrike in Iraq on Friday that killed Qassem Soleimani, Trump fought the Iranian Maj. Gen. in 2018 with memes inspired by "Game of Thrones."
  • After tensions escalated between Trump and Iran's president Hassan Rouhani in July 2018, Soleimani first posted an edited image from the movie "Olympus Has Fallen" to his Instagram that showed him standing in front of an exploding White House.
  • In November 2018, after Trump withdrew from the 3-year-old nuclear deal with Iran, the president tweeted a "Game of Thrones" meme of himself that said "Sanctions are coming" in the TV series' signature font.
  • The next day, Soleimani posted a similar "Game of Thrones" meme of himself on Instagram that said "I will stand against you."
  • In April 2019, Soleimani's Instagram account was suspended, after the US officially designated the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps, or Quds Force, a foreign terrorist organization.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

News of a US airstrike in Iraq that killed a top Iranian general has spawned thousands of memes about an impending World War III. Before President Donald Trump's administration carried out the assassination of Qassem Soleimani, the Maj. Gen. fought back against Trump in 2018 with memes of his own.

The Washington Post reports that Soleimani posted his first cinematic meme in July 2018, after Trump clashed with Iran's president Hassan Rouhani. Escalating tensions between the two countries led Rouhani to say "America should know that peace with Iran is the mother of all peace, and war with Iran is the mother of all war."

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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How to consolidate credit card debt to streamline your payments and lower your interest rate

Posted: 04 Jan 2020 07:34 AM PST

how to consolidate credit card debtSeyed Morteza Shakeri / EyeEm

  • Consolidating credit card debt means taking out one new loan to replace multiple loans, and consolidate them into a single monthly payment that's preferably at a lower interest rate than the original loans.
  • Two of the most popular options to consolidate credit card debt are transferring the debt to a balance transfer credit card or taking out a personal loan.
  • A balance transfer card can be a good idea if the transfer fee is worth it, and if you know you'll be able to pay all or most of your debt before the introductory APR expires.
  • A personal loan could be a better choice if you need more time to pay, and if you can get a lower interest rate than you currently have on your debt.
  • Note that consolidating your credit card debt doesn't mean you're debt-free. You're taking out a new debt to replace your old ones, and you're still responsible for paying it back.
  • Read more personal finance coverage.

When you have credit card debt on multiple cards, from more than one lender, it can feel like a scramble to keep up with your payments every month.

Credit card consolidation can be an option to reduce the stress of multiple loans. Debt consolidation is the process of combining your debts from multiple lenders into a single loan, typically at a lower interest rate. Essentially, you ask a lender — sometimes a credit card, sometimes a bank — to buy out your multiple loans, and you agree to pay back the lender according to its terms.

See the rest of the story at Business Insider

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